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The Cid, Part 1

The Exile
By: El Cid
Narrated by: Dr. Edmund de Chasca
Length: 58 mins
Categories: Classics, World Literature
5 out of 5 stars (1 rating)

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Summary

Excerpts from the classic medieval poem, performed in the original language with English translation, original music, and commentary.
©1980 Charles Potter (P)1980 Charles Potter

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Profile Image for Ted
  • Ted
  • 03-08-12

Horrible performance! Don't buy it!

What disappointed you about The Cid, Part 1?

Unintelligible! The English over Spanish format makes it unlistenable in either language

What didn???t you like about Edmund de Chasca???s performance?

Again, someone's "cute" idea of recording the English translation over the medieval Spanish was a disaster.

Any additional comments?

Audible, take this book out of the store!!!

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Tad Davis
  • 10-01-20

Interesting, but a hard listen

The audiobook is unusual. It's not a full reading of the poem. Passages are read in Spanish, with an accompanying guitar. A narrator speaks over this from time to time to summarize the action; at other times another voice translates some of the passages as they're being read, using WS Merwin’s translation as a base. And then also from time to time the narrative is interrupted for commentary from a team of scholars. The effect is to give a flavor of the poem and provide some of the context. But it's not an immersive experience.

There is one significant problem with the production. There isn't a clear separation of sound between the Spanish and English as they are being spoken. Listening closely with good earphones helps. The intended effect apparently was similar to that in radio news broadcasts, where a speaker begins in a native language, then fades into the background while an English-speaking interpreter takes over. But here, they forgot to hit the “fade” button.

It's also important to note that this is only the first half of the story. The conclusion is sold separately.