Listen with a free trial

One credit a month, good for any title to download and keep.
Unlimited listening to the Plus Catalogue - thousands of select Audible Originals, podcasts and audiobooks.
Exclusive member-only deals.
No commitment - cancel anytime.
Episodes
  • Feb 9 2021

    Student doctor Ivan Beckley gathers evidence of structural bias in medicine; exploring the foundations of modern medical knowledge and the way doctors are trained.

    Show More Show Less
    1 hr
  • Feb 9 2021

    Imagine telling someone you’re in pain. How do you know that they believe you? Why is some people’s pain perceived differently to others? And what does that mean for those with chronic and life-threatening illnesses?

    Show More Show Less
    58 mins
  • Feb 9 2021

    Ivan steps into the world of mental health. How much the diagnosis and treatment of mental illness is actually shaped by physical appearance? 

    Show More Show Less
    1 hr and 2 mins
Ivan Beckley

About the presenter

Ivan Beckley is a final year student doctor at University College London medical school. Alongside his studies, Ivan is an NHS clinical entrepreneur as CEO of Suvera, a healthcare company enabling virtual care for people with long-term conditions in the UK. Whilst at medical school Ivan has worked with a number of health technology companies, including Google DeepMind, working on AI healthcare algorithms. As part of his work, DeepMind sponsored his MSc in health data science, which he completed in 2018.

As recognition of Ivan’s achievements in 2015, he was awarded one of the top 10 black students in the UK by Rare recruitment and No.3 on the list of Top 100 African and Caribbean graduates and undergraduates by Powerful Media. Fundamentally Ivan believes there is no problem too big to solve. He hopes to focus his career on demonstrating the potential for technology to create universal healthcare coverage for all of humanity.

The stories behind the statistics

Avery Smith
  • Avery Smith
Hear Avery talking about his wife Latoya in episode 1: Knowledge
Tobi Adebajo
  • Tobi Adebajo
Tobi talks about pain in episode 2
Colin King
  • Colin King
Colin shares his experiences in episode 3: Thought
Ernestine Ndzi
  • Ernestine Ndzi
Ernestine is one of the women we hear from in episode 4: Birth
Ola Ojewumi
  • Ola Ojewumi
Listen to Ola's story in episode 5: Breathe
  • Avery Smith
  • Hear Avery talking about his wife Latoya in episode 1: Knowledge
  • Tobi Adebajo
  • Tobi talks about pain in episode 2
  • Colin King
  • Colin shares his experiences in episode 3: Thought
  • Ernestine Ndzi
  • Ernestine is one of the women we hear from in episode 4: Birth
  • Ola Ojewumi
  • Listen to Ola's story in episode 5: Breathe

Find out why Ivan has recorded this podcast

0:00

What listeners say about The Bias Diagnosis

Average customer ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    243
  • 4 Stars
    33
  • 3 Stars
    9
  • 2 Stars
    6
  • 1 Stars
    15
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    196
  • 4 Stars
    39
  • 3 Stars
    14
  • 2 Stars
    8
  • 1 Stars
    12
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    214
  • 4 Stars
    28
  • 3 Stars
    6
  • 2 Stars
    7
  • 1 Stars
    14

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Eye opening

As someone who is training in the medical field, this has really been eye opening because it made me look again at my biases and those present in my training and question it. One big take away I get from this series is that people from the BME are less likely to voice out their fears and it's upto us to help them find their voice!

15 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Incredible...I couldn’t believe my ears

This was such a thought provoking podcast and a must listen for anyone in the healthcare profession. I believed myself to be quite clued in when it came to issues around racial inequalities and prejudice in medicine until I listened to this - some of the stories are shocking and we clearly have much more work to do than I originally thought!

14 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Eye opener

Eye-opening, at least for me. Be prepared for some shocking facts. Medicine is just one part of the whole system, but so important as it is about people's lives.

11 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Excellent content, important topic of discussion

Background noise is irritating but the content was superb.

I have a better understanding as to why the black community has been hit harder by covid and continue to be cared less effectively for by practitioners.

I would love to listen to a more in depth evaluation on this topic.

9 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Eye opening, shocking. Really makes you think.

As above. Essential listening. I wouldn't say I had no idea but when you hear people's stories it makes it real.

8 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Incredibly moving and insightful

As an ICU nurse, I can completely echo what has been expressed in this incredibly insightful piece of work. There have been times where black and brown patients have been labelled as 'faking it', 'overdoing it' or 'aggressive', by fellow members of staff for expressing genuine symptoms that naturally cause people distress. However, the same colleagues seem to have a wealth of care and compassion available for patients that resemble them. Not to mention, the lack of diversity in textbooks and modern health education which makes it impossible to adequately tend to the needs of black and brown patients. When we question educators on it, all they say is 'sorry, it's not available, we'll look into it' and then radio silence.
Even though I'm a nurse, I worry about my mum one day needing to go to hospital, because I'm worried that she may not get the adequate service she needs.

7 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Incredibly important work

This was horrifying. I've known for a long time that women and POC doesn't get the same help as white men. But this was still an eye opener. I actually thought there were subtle differences between "races", I thought some of the reason why POC have highest mortality rates were because medicines doesn't necessarily work the same way. Turns out, it's not. It's solely because they are treated worse.
I've had my share of bad treatment, which has resulted in 7 years of disability so far, and over 20 surgeries. I've often thought how different it would be if I were a man. Statistically, I would probably have been listened to from the start, and been given the necessary antibiotics and gone about my life. However, I am lucky to be white. If I had been a WOC, I would statistically have lost a limb, or even my life.

7 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Everyone needs to hear this!

What's shocking is the fact that although there is anecdotal bias, there is also inbuilt systemic bias that even the most educated and well-meaning clinicians aren't aware of. A real eye opener. everyone should listen regardless of your ethnicity. as service users we ALL need to know and understand how susceptible our healthcare is to false and discriminatory data and practice.

6 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Eye opening!

Wow. Loved this. An area of the healthcare system dissected and explored. Everybody educate themselves continuously!

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Great inside to the a multifaceted subject.

I listened to it all in one go! very boring job really made the Monday fly by real quick! absolutely interesting and beautifully presented. personable, emotional and truly eye opening must listen!

3 people found this helpful

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Michelle W.
  • Michelle W.
  • 17-02-21

Sound FX, anyone?

This is an incredibly important issue and the overblown and distracting sound effects (slow crescendos, tolling bells, discordances, pianos, etc.) just makes a parody of the topic. If you mention a choir, we don’t need to hear a choir. If there’s a pause in the interviews, don’t fill it with some instrumental. Less is more.

13 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Alise
  • Alise
  • 11-02-21

The Haunting Truth

This is a very real podcast about a very serious issue. I appreciate shedding a light on a very real problem in the medical field. I have personally had experience with not being treated well, listened to, and quality care. Many have been seriously hurt and traumatized by bias treatment from from some doctors (including myself).

7 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Doc
  • Doc
  • 17-03-21

compelling stories wrapped in tripe.

The series presents some excellent story-based examples of inequities in health outcomes. It wraps them, however, in completely inappropriate dramatic music (a ball rolling around a bowl, really?). More importantly, the author (the person telling the story is not the author - who confusingly appears in the series, too) keeps realigning like a magnet to the idea that the inequities are not multifactorial, but rather simply a racist/mysoginistic/discriminatory system at work. thus, a great opportunity to discuss this complex but very real issue in human terms is buried in the reductive argument of systemic racism. a lost opportunity, indeed. 3 stars for the great stories in this series.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for EmilyK
  • EmilyK
  • 28-02-21

Good but done before

I thought this was an interesting insight but I felt like I had heard most of the examples before. Black Doctor in a White Coat and other more recent works seem to cover this ground better, and somewhat more objectively.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Dr Rick
  • Dr Rick
  • 17-03-21

Slick propaganda podcast

Reviewer “Doc” describes this well. If your world view includes the bias that anti-black racism is the root cause of poor health outcomes for black people living in developed or northern countries, this is for you. There are multiple examples here designed to reinforce your view. In every example, a racist bias is implied without any critical examination or alternative factor considered.
I am personally informed, and sometimes expert, on most of the issues mentioned and I AGREE THAT PROBABLY OVER HALF THE EXAMPLES GIVEN ARE MOSTLY BASED ON RACISM in some way. But many are not. And none of the examples include a proper treatment or way forward. So this podcast perpetuates the concept that blacks are victims and their role is to accept this, either passively or with complaint, and not do anything to help themselves.
[Ultimately, this podcast is like hundreds of others that exist mostly to perpetuate the media narrative in 2 ways. In the USA, NPR churns out several podcasts and stories with exactly this theme on a daily basis. There is no critical analysis nor presentation of alternative ideas, hence it is really just propaganda designed to perpetuate a point of view and potential learning benefits are lost. The second misdirection is to imply that healthcare is included in medical care or can be ignored.]

It scares me that Ivan is almost qualified to be a doctor and doesn’t know better. It is a serious problem magnified by the fact that he is himself black. Black patients will be misguided by him. The “everything bad that happens to you is caused by racism” myth will be perpetuated. Worse, the actions that Ivan and his black patients could take to get healthy are less likely to be taken.

I would like to come back and address some of these issues individually and will do so if others find this review “Helpful”.

The main answer to negative health outcomes for blacks in northern latitudes is MAKE SURE YOUR VITAMIN D LEVEL IS NORMAL. This is the elephant in the living room, it is staggeringly important. Depending on the condition considered, the disparity of outcomes between blacks and whites is 50-80% explained just by the much lower level of Vitamin D that the average black person has when living away from the equator and not getting sufficient sunlight. In the USA, about 80% of African-Americans have Vitamin D Deficiency (not just suboptimal Vitamin D which is about 90%, but a level low enough to definitely negatively impact health). This is also common in white people and causes harm in 20-50% of whites but is a little better tolerated. In other words, Blacks are at least 3 times more likely than whites to be deficient. The recent Covid-19 pandemic illustrated this with a bang. Vitamin D is not a vitamin as it does not come in food to any significant extent, maybe a little in fortification or codliver oil but not enough. Vitamin D is an anabolic steroid like testosterone or estrogen (and others like DHEA, etc) and your body will make it for you but Ultraviolet B rays on the skin are needed. If your skin is darkly pigmented, you will need 3+ times more sun exposure to make the same as a pale person. (So Vitamin D deficiency is not really a problem of race but of color mostly and urban living somewhat. A distinction that is often missed). Two other things to know about Vitamin D: 1. after it is made or taken as a supplement, it goes into your liver and if your liver is fatty, you may need 10 times more than someone with a liver that isn’t fat. 2. Vitamin D increases bone strength, speeds healing, shortens pain and keeps mental illness like depression and schizophrenia away but more than anything else, it keeps your immune system working properly. This reduces cancer incidence and increases survival if you have cancer but most of all it helps if you are infected with a virus. MANY STUDIES FROM AROUND THE WORLD HAVE CONSISTENTLY SHOWN THAT PEOPLE WITH VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY ARE UP TO 2 TIMES MORE LIKELY TO CONTRACT COVID-19 AND, ONCE INFECTED, ARE 3-10 TIMES MORE LIKELY TO DIE!!!!!
[it is probably inappropriate for a doctor to give medical advice in a review so I won’t discuss the guidelines of supplementation but I do need to mention 2 other deficiencies that likely contribute to poor outcomes in Blacks somewhat more than whites: Zinc and Magnesium. NHANES data in America consistently show that Blacks do not eat 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day (of course neither do most whites, it’s getting worse) and nutritional deficiencies are the most common diseases in America. Vitamin D and magnesium work in tandem in many ways and it is perhaps more dangerous to supplement with one when the other is also deficient; if you don’t eat well, both Zinc and Magnesium work as supplemental pills. If you get to the part of the podcast where Blacks in the UK are 5-7 times more likely to be diagnosed with schizophrenia, realize that part of this is racial normative behavior bias and part is Zinc deficiency.)

BIAS is an appropriate title for this podcast. It implies a tendency to jump to 1 of 2 conclusions or judgements. Built into the word is the root for two. There are often multiple choices in thought patterns and already the title is telling you to narrow your thinking to only two. Besides racial bias, there is a bias to think of medical treatment as healthcare treatment. This is as stupid as thinking that Liberal and Conservative or Democrat and Republican mean the same thing. The media narrative in developed worlds, especially in America where medical care (often mis-dubbed as healthcare) is commercial, is to not consider health care at all and throw yourself into the hands of the medical world for their profit and maybe their help. The healthcare world has absolutely no voice in the commercial media and journalists will falsely call medical care people “healthcare experts”. A blatant lie. Health care is therefore up to you, whatever color or race you are. The easiest first steps by far are supplementing, if appropriate, with vitamin D, Zinc and Magnesium if you might be deficient. All 3 of these can be harmful if taken as supplements in excess (although diarrhea is the only harm from excess Magnesium), so the other thing to do is educate yourself. As Ivan helps illustrate, do not expect a medical person to help with that, it is not what we do.
[ If you want to live longer or better: Regular exercise, normal or “healthy” diet and avoidance of addictions and trauma all rank well ahead of anything the medical world can offer. ]

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 17-02-21

Fundamental

Overall Podcast is sufficient to anyone in the medical department or just interested about racial views and tensions. Really enjoyed the different cases but the narrator was sometimes hard to understand hint the British accent.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Amazon Customer
  • Amazon Customer
  • 14-02-21

Just the beginning...

I've FEARED being misdiagnosed since 2010,, no clear answers or research or honesty from doctor.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for gypsy
  • gypsy
  • 15-03-21

I wish they touched more on other bias

I wish they touched more on other bias such as gender and weight... and how bias can be cumulative if multiple potential bias effeet the patient, it bugs me because some of the stuff they reference could have also have been a great opportunity to bring that up.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Stephen
  • Stephen
  • 12-03-21

Woke dribble.

I thought it would be a story of substance but it is about how people of color get misdiagnosed because of skin color and then blames it on medical texts only have pictures of white people. The author may the statement that he looked up a certain type of skin cancer on google and could not find any picture of people of color. I did the search on multiple search engines and found many pictures in just a few seconds.. Just a blame fest while people need to take charge of their own lives. If you thinks that their are not enough books with appropriate pictures get it printed. But don’t just blame others.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for TS
  • TS
  • 17-02-21

Very interesting

This was such a good podcast! Very well researched and informative. I'd love for people who think that racism doesn't exist to listen carefully to this.

1 person found this helpful