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Stubborn Attachments

A Vision for a Society of Free, Prosperous, and Responsible Individuals
Narrated by: Jeremy Arthur
Length: 3 hrs and 32 mins
4 out of 5 stars (9 ratings)
Regular price: £13.79
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Summary

Growth is good. Through history, economic growth, in particular, has alleviated human misery, improved human happiness and opportunity, and lengthened human lives. Wealthier societies are more stable, offer better living standards, produce better medicines, and ensure greater autonomy, greater fulfillment, and more sources of fun. If we want to continue on our trends of growth and the overwhelmingly positive outcomes for societies that come with it, every individual must become more concerned with the welfare of those around us and in the world at large and most of all, our descendants in the future. So, how do we proceed? 

Tyler Cowen, in a culmination of 20 years of thinking and research, provides a road map for moving forward. In this new audiobook, Stubborn Attachments: A Vision for a Society of Free, Prosperous, and Responsible Individuals, Cowen argues that our reason and common sense can help free us of the faulty ideas that hold us back as people and as a society. Stubborn Attachments, at its heart, makes the contemporary moral case for economic growth and delivers a great dose of inspiration and optimism about our future possibilities.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2018 Stripe Press (P)2018 Stripe Press

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  • Overall
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  • Amazon Customer
  • 24-11-18

Causal vs casual

This may seem like a small thing, but I assure you it is not. Tyler Cowen’s work is phenomenal.

But every time he used the word “causal,” the narrator said “casual.”

This is inexcusable.

If you’re gonna narrate books written by famous social scientists, you need to know how to pronounce the word “causal.”

5 stats for the book.
2 stars for the performance.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Chris
  • 18-11-18

Causal is not “casual”

It was very annoying to hear the narrator say “casual “ for “causal”.

I’d be happy to hear Cowen talk about growth in context of a single global society, such as that which Yuval Noah Harari sees us moving to.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • David Iach
  • 17-10-18

What has economic growth ever done for us?

Tyler Cowen argues that economic growth is one of the best things that happened in human history and that cultivating it for the generations to come, is a moral imperative.

This is a very underrated idea, but one that all people who want to make the world a better place should seriously consider.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • pedro barker
  • 02-03-19

good morning great book

very good book need to read 👍😊 like to day hope you like it and

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 14-12-18

Confusing, technical

Interested perspective, that's for sure. Not that positive I enjoyed it as much as I expected.

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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 05-11-18

comprehensive and thoughtful

good thoughts, well organized and practically applied. very enjoyable to listen to, I would slow down the speed though