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Stone Free

Narrated by: Andrew Loog Oldham
Length: 12 hrs and 7 mins
3 out of 5 stars (3 ratings)

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Summary

Stone Free is the third part of my triography. It is an affectionate look at impresarios I have admired, loved and loathed. There are profiles on Serge Diaghilev, Mike Todd, Otto Preminger, Larry Parnes and John Kennedy, Brian Epstein, Don Arden, Kit Lambert and Chris Stamp, Malcolm McLaren, Albert Grossman, Phil Spector, Allen Klein, and more. It is also a summing up of the bands and lads who started out in the '60's and are now leaving their own - as bands become brands and enter their 70s - what's left of The Beatles, The Stones, and The Who.

©2012 Because Entertainment, Inc. (P)2012 Because Entertainment, Inc.

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Profile Image for Fred Kaffing
  • Fred Kaffing
  • 10-08-14

Fascinating rock recollections

Would you listen to Stone Free again? Why?

Yes. I like the book.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Andrew himself of course, for all the people he knew I suppose and his own involvement in all this history.

What does Andrew Loog Oldham bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

He is writing about his own experiences and observations. He is an experienced broadcaster from the Underground Garage.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Almost, it's too long for that, but long periods anyway.

Any additional comments?

There are insights and recollections of the 60s of people and events, up to almost the present day. His recollections of his record label, Immediate are interesting, along with the outcomes up to more recent times when he went to court over it. There are insights into the music industry and large names of it. His comments about the state of the music industry towards the end are interesting. The book is largely about people he has known in the industry he calls 'hustlers' but it seems more than that, or maybe the music industry is all that. Memorable names he discusses include Phil Spector, Don Arden, Brian Epstein and lots of others. And did Elvis want to be like Dean Martin?

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