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Summary

Instant New York Times best seller

A Science News Favorite Science Book of 2019

As you listen to these words, copies of you are being created. Sean Carroll, theoretical physicist and one of this world’s most celebrated writers on science, rewrites the history of 20th-century physics. Already hailed as a masterpiece, Something Deeply Hidden shows for the first time that facing up to the essential puzzle of quantum mechanics utterly transforms how we think about space and time. His reconciling of quantum mechanics with Einstein’s theory of relativity changes, well, everything. Most physicists haven’t even recognized the uncomfortable truth: Physics has been in crisis since 1927.

Quantum mechanics has always had obvious gaps - which have come to be simply ignored. Science popularizers keep telling us how weird it is, how impossible it is to understand. Academics discourage students from working on the "dead end" of quantum foundations. Putting his professional reputation on the line with this audacious yet entirely reasonable audiobook, Carroll says that the crisis can now come to an end. We just have to accept that there is more than one of us in the universe. There are many, many Sean Carrolls. Many of every one of us.

Copies of you are generated thousands of times per second. The Many Worlds Theory of quantum behavior says that every time there is a quantum event, a world splits off with everything in it the same, except in that other world, the quantum event didn't happen. Step-by-step in Carroll's uniquely lucid way, he tackles the major objections to this otherworldly revelation until his case is inescapably established.

Rarely does a book so fully reorganize how we think about our place in the universe. We are on the threshold of a new understanding - of where we are in the cosmos, and what we are made of.

©2019 Sean Carroll (P)2019 Penguin Audio

Critic reviews

"What makes Carroll's new project so worthwhile, though, is that while he is most certainly choosing sides in the debate, he offers us a cogent, clear and compelling guide to the subject while letting his passion for the scientific questions shine through every page." (NPR)

“Carroll argues with a healthy restlessness that makes his book more interesting than so many others in the quantum physics genre.” (Forbes)

"Something Deeply Hidden is Carroll’s ambitious and engaging foray into what quantum mechanics really means and what it tells us about physical reality." (Science Magazine)

What listeners say about Something Deeply Hidden

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Super position of all relevant texts.

Great work! Sean Carroll recording it himself was important to me. Would have lost interest quickly if it was in the voice of some random speaker who could'nt care less about quantum waves and field theory. Thank you!

5 people found this helpful

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Sean Carroll is very knowledgeable, I am not

Reluctantly I stopped listening. this latest book is too complex for my uneducated mind. Sean however is as fantastic as ever as a narrator. his knowledge of the subject is conveyed. I have listened to too many books where the narrator provides emphasis and punctuation in a way that it is obvious that they have no knowledge of the topic.

I will, without doubt listen to Sean again, I may even listen to this one if my understanding develops.

4 people found this helpful

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Easy to understand. Great narrating.

So much information packed into each chapter. Carroll explains concepts well. Flows like a story with bolstering physics theories and formulae. will listen again.

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Still struggling

Elegantly explained I have no doubt, except that I still struggle to understand. My limitation not the books

2 people found this helpful

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Many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics

Thorough overview of many worlds, really enjoyed it and its narrated by Sean himself

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not a clue

I love Sean Carroll but I've no idea what he was on about. anyone? help!

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Engagingly read, and knows what he’s talking about

It’s heavily biased towards many-worlds, and yet makes a very good case for the position that we can’t tell which interpretation is “correct”, or what that even means scientifically - we literally can’t tell them apart. The justification for many worlds is only that, in the absence of any reason to add more bells and whistles to the theory, we’re left with the bare bones, and these inherently include “worlds” branching off from one another, and the “you” of the future is really a very large set of “yous”, all with an equal right to think of themselves as the successor of the “you” from the past, so in the end, the answer to the question “if the photon could have gone either way, why did it go THAT way?” is “it just did, as far as this world and all it’s successors are concerned.” All this is thoroughly discussed in a friendly, no-idiot-left-behind way, and he reads his own writing very well.

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Fascinating!

Loved it. Sean Carroll also has a (free) video series that goes into more depth. It's on his website and on youtube. he's also done some good talks. Highly recommend. Fascinating topic. Great communicator!

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Superb

Such a fantastic detail of our stunningly elegant universe. Thank you Sean for sharing your wonderfully structured understanding of time with us. As I touch the keyboard, entropy increases taking all in its finite grasp. Wonderful wonderful book.

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amazing but what

think I need to listen another 12 times until I understand, but very much enjoyed trying