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Summary

The new book from the UK's leading criminologist, David Wilson

Before David Wilson became the UK's pre-eminent criminologist, he was just a young boy growing up in the Scottish town of Carluke. As a child, the brutal murder of a young woman rocked this small community, but very quickly a man was arrested for the crime, convicted and put behind bars. For most, life slowly carried on - case closed. 

But there were whispers in the town, that the wrong man was behind bars. Over the years, these whispers grew louder, to the point that any time David would visit, friends and acquaintances would ask in hushed tones: 'But what are you going to do about the Carluke Case?'

Carluke believed that a young man had been wrongly convicted. A murderer was still on the loose.

Forty years later, it's time for David to return home, and find out the truth.

©2020 David Wilson (P)2020 Hachette Audio UK

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Please re-record with different narrator!

I had this on my wishlist and was very much looking forward to listening. Can't even make it past the first chapter due to the narration. Sounds like a newsreader. Emphasis and inflection in all the wrong places, makes me feel queasy listenting to it.

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Quest for truth

Expect few folk have heard of Carluke, Wilson’s home town, where brutal murder of a young woman on her way to the station in 1973 marked his teenage years. His family still live there, & doubts of local community of the justice of rapid arrest of a young man who had learning disability eventually prompted him to conduct his own investigation. Shame on the reviewer who doesn’t like author’s accent!

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Criminology

Absolutely fascinating, really good book! Such an interesting piece of work. Will read more of his books in the near future.

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Wow!

This book is an incredible work of investigation and tenacity! It details an extraordinary miscarriage of justice in a small Scottish Town in the 1960s, and how one man had served a prison sentence for a murder he did not commit.
The real murderer walks free - it’s a gripping wait to see if Prof Wilson finds him.
I love Wilson’s books, I learn so much from them and this is no exception. Very very good.

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I knew it would.be good but...

This book surpassed my expectations. Not only was it the account of David's investigation but it was a detailed breakdown of many aspects of criminal psychology and human behaviour. Fascinating. Thank-you. Fingers crossed that Police Scotland act on this.

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Thought provoking!

David guides you through an intriguing and historical set of events that shocked the town of Carluke. An interesting and thought provoking journey, supplemented with insights into the world of a criminologist and psychologist. David’s delivery draws you in and somehow manages to take you with him as he weaves his way through almost 50 years worth of tales, gossip and truth.

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Signs of Murder

Really enjoyed this book. Thank you to the author for his determination and hard work in putting this book together. A good detailed investigation and I always enjoy David Wilson’s narration. Hope there will be a third book in the near future.

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Brilliant and interesting but...

I loved this, incredibly interesting and well done. Only loses stars as narration takes a bit of getting used to. Intonation etc was a bit difficult at first but as I listened more I got used to it. Definitely worth persisting with.

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A request for real justice

This audiobook is an absolute must listen for all who want true justice to be served. A shocking murder that had the wrong person convicted cannot be left as a closed case and I hope this book can gain the support of the people to insist on reopening and finding the true identity of the perpetrator.

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  • emkje
  • 23-06-21

A passion project

I felt like I wasn't the intended audience. Plus the lack of access to the original police investigation made the story thin and stretched.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 29-07-20

Disappointing

Look, I am a fan of David Wilson and I am always happy to see him pop up in various documentaries, so I purchased his book.

Unfortunately, this is an example of an author who should not have narrated his own book. His voice has a lovely tone and his pace is good but he reads every sentence and paragraph with the same pattern of intonation. That and the upward inflexion at the end of every sentence is effective in sound bite situations but it is just annoying when applied to the reading of a whole book. It drove me nuts.

I can't finish this book and will be returning it.

Sorry David. I remain a fan.

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  • Buretto
  • 24-07-20

A bit misleading, thin on story

The problem with this book, as I see it, is that the author has tried to promote a book which is essentially a social polemic, as a true crime mystery. In fact, the murder and its investigation merely play a supporting part in the story. Much more important for the author is for the listener to understand his qualifications (I gave up trying to count how many times he referred to himself with some version of the word "criminologist"). It's telling that he clearly understands confirmation bias, but is willfully ignorant of his own. We're meant to believe that his (ostensibly independent) criminological autopsy targeted the same person who the whole town seems to suspect, and was, not shockingly, an ex-boyfriend of the victim. It strains credulity. Which is not even a problem, since the individual is already well known. The personal investigation is only meant to establish the author's criminological bona fides, and provide an ego boost.

Personally, I disagree with virtually none of the political or social dynamics the author espouses. There is a clearly progressive agenda proposed for the criminal justice system and greater society, both in Scotland and the world, which is quite reasonable and admirable. However, the manner in which its presented falls woefully short. Copious citations of others' research and studies drags the book at times into a second-rate introductory text to human psychology and social patterns. And it only ever tangentially touches back onto the main topic, the murder of a young woman in Carluke, Scotland. Frankly, that story would have been better served as one of a compilation of social injustices supporting the primary theme of improving policing and community involvement, which this book essentially is, though with only the one example. And particularly ridiculous was the faux feminism exhibited in his introduction of his "Bakehouse Cafe sounding board", a collection of women, including his sisters, who recount their memories from 1973. It's so tone-deaf in its patronizing manner to be laughable. He refuses to give physical descriptions of the women, as it would be objectifying, and detract from their dazzling insights. Presumably the troglodyte listeners won't be able to sufficiently focus, though this doesn't stop him from later making references about "a woman of her age" and "looking fit". But it's clear, he just wants to be viewed as a good guy. Pity he wasn't a better author.