Regular price: £20.89

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – choose any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • Free, unlimited access to Audio Shows
  • After your trial, Audible is just £7.99/month
OR
In Basket

Summary

It's 1914. The outbreak of war. In the French city of Arras, a Father is brutally murdered. The Catholic Inquisition sends its most determined of inquisitors, Poldek Tacit, to investigate.

Yet as Tacit arrives, armed forces confront each other across No Man's Land. As he strives in vain to establish the truth behind the murder, a beautiful woman, Sandrine, warns British soldier Henry Frost of a mutual foe even more terrible lurking beneath the killing fields....

©2015 Tarn Richardson (P)2016 W F Howes Ltd

More from the same

What members say

Average customer ratings

Overall

  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1

Performance

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1
Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Interesting and unusual story

Werewolves, Catholics, world war and sex and violence. An interesting read with weird mash up of themes. Good pace and intriguing story line.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Not great


I disliked this book right from the off but I persevered until about a third of the way through and by that point I wanted to throw myself in to the jaws of the nearest werewolf.

The juvenile plot constantly flips from one thread to another in an obvious attempt by the author to make the story appear to be complex and sophisticated but this is so badly done that the writing style comes across as amateurish and disjointed.

The characters are mostly absurd clichés and the weak attempts by the author to add depth only serves to make each of the main players seem more and more ridiculous. The incidental characters are just tossed in to the story to die, like those non speaking bit part players who wear the red shirts in Star Trek.

The narrator does his best with the material at hand but his limited repertoire of voices only makes things worse but to be fair, even Sir Lawrence Olivier would struggle to improve drivel such as this.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful