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Summary

We’re told that if we care about our health - or our planet - eliminating red meat from our diets is crucial. That beef is bad for us and cattle farming is horrible for the environment. But science says otherwise.

Beef is framed as the most environmentally destructive and least healthy of meats. We’re often told that the only solution is to reduce or quit red meat entirely. But despite what anti-meat groups, vegan celebrities, and some health experts say, plant-based agriculture is far from a perfect solution. In Sacred Cow, registered dietitian Diana Rodgers and former research biochemist and New York Times best-selling author Robb Wolf explore the quandaries we face in raising and eating animals - focusing on the largest (and most maligned) of farmed animals, the cow.

Taking a critical look at the assumptions and misinformation about meat, Sacred Cow points out the flaws in our current food system and in the proposed “solutions”. Inside, Rodgers and Wolf reveal contrarian but science-based findings, such as:

  • Meat and animal fat are essential for our bodies
  • A sustainable food system cannot exist without animals
  • A vegan diet may destroy more life than sustainable cattle farming
  • Regenerative cattle ranching is one of our best tools at mitigating climate change

You’ll also find practical guidance on how to support sustainable farms and a 30-day challenge to help you transition to a healthful and conscientious diet. With scientific rigor, deep compassion, and wit, Rodgers and Wolf argue unequivocally that meat (done right) should have a place on the table. 

It’s not the cow, it’s the how!

 PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio. 

©2020 Diana Rodgers, RD and Robb Wolf (P)2020 Blackstone Publishing

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Top book!

A great listen, very factual not at all dogmatic. Highlights the problems with monocrop agriculture damaging our topsoil and its sustainability issue. Shows the benefits of regenerative grazing ruminants to biodiversity and why this IS something we can sustain. Diana and Robb also do a great job explaining the health benefits of nutrient dense meat whether grassfed of not.

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Moo-ving

The Sacred Cow offers critical challenges to how we understand how food systems operate.

There is no such thing as a bloodless plate but animals don't have to be raised in poor conditions. Effective management of livestock can positively impact emissions too. The book dips its toes into the potential damage to ourselves and environments we could cause by going meat free.

Tim Spector's Diet Myth indicates through studies that each of us have unique digestive systems so certain diets won't yield the same results, even in twins. Therefore conjecture about diet efficacy can only be deduced as speculative.

This book is for anyone wanting to understand how we might consider more ethical farming and eating methods.



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Loved it

It was an addition to the grain brain and keto diet book. I really loved this approach. I loved the book.

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Food for thought, and thought for food.

More people should read this. The world might literally be a better place if they did!

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A must read!

Very well written, thorough and sensible examination of a vitally important subject. Highly recommended! Everyone should read this book.

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An important and pertinent read

Don’t expect to read this from cover to cover. Read a bit at a time and absorb the content properly. This is an important work. I hope that we as a species can take heed and act now. All of us can act as individuals, and support the regenerative system this book so well explains. Let’s get cracking.

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A book the world needs!

The information in this book can save your health, improve the World’s food supply and the soil. Better animal welfare and make a sustainable ecosystem of it all. My hope is that this book becomes a bestseller! You should read this book!!

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a book for everyone

everyone must read this book as soon as possible and do their bit to save the world.

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  • Ralph Ospina
  • 19-08-20

Must read!!

Diana and Robb do an excellent job of truly making the case for better meat. They present the information in a very organized fashion. Although it’s dense, it’s easy to read (you may need to just read it a few times over). I can not recommend this book enough!! If you’re concerned about the environment, global economy, global food system and it’s sustainability, and optimal health, then this book is a must read!!

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  • Benjamin D.
  • 10-12-20

Visionary

This book is a must read for anyone who practices conscious eating in the modern era.

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  • ashley howard
  • 25-11-20

Life Altering

This book and the information in it is so important and really changes the way you see life.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 24-11-20

Absolutely essential listening

This is one of the most important books of our time. If everyone listened to the information contained within, the world would be revolutionised in the most empowering way. You won't regret choosing this book.

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  • Wes C
  • 06-11-20

Excellent Read and Knowledge

Excellent read and knowledge from two authors who are cutting through the noise to deliver information and a perspective that is objective and well-intended for our future environment and food system.

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  • Ethan
  • 24-10-20

Must read: health, global warming, sustainability

This is the most thoughtful and holistic discussion I have seen of the interaction between farming, health, global warming, and sustainability. it should be on the high school required reading list to help give everyone a clue on how big the problem actually is.

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  • John Kearns
  • 22-10-20

This book should be required reading.

This book is positively eye opening, completely changed my perception of the Westernized food system and gave me an invaluable perspective on how to eat and shop. Even if you don't think you'll be interested in the topic, give this a shot since I'm sure it'll surprise you.

It expresses it's arguments in a clear manner anyone could understand and makes an irrefutably strong case for the widespread implementation of cattle in the food system.

I loved this book.

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  • vpereira
  • 28-05-21

Biased view would be expected, but selecting evidence and dehumanizing vegans is not great

There is a lot in this book and even though the authors starts by committing to stay true to evidence and also acknowledge the world has a lot of nuances, they spend most of the book ignoring that fact.

Let me disclose I’m not vegan nor paleo, but I try to eat 90% whole food plant based foods. And I read this book to challenge my biases and views, but I was expecting real scientific rigor and got the opposite of it.

Let me start with something the authors fail yo acknowledge but that both extremes(less animal, more animal) seem to agree, if one focus on locally produced whole foods (be them animal or plants) this is probably the main key contributor one can have today for both health and climate. Both extremes will get one in a best shape than today for most of westernized population and will force the industry to adapt. And unlike the authors try to claim, none will require vast amount of vitamins. B12 for plant only eaters and probably Cobalt for the cows so they can synthesize B12 :) And in neither you would be protein, iron or any other main nutrient deficient.

Few things about the book:
1. I don’t understand if the author is attacking vegans or the whole food plant based movement. They do openly attack vegans and I think without understanding what being a vegan is. I’m not a specialist either but Vegans seem to be more against exploitation of animals (and humans by the way) than they are against deaths are needed in nature. While as a farm owner the authors seems to paint a beautiful picture about farmers which care by each of their animals, we all know that’s not how billions and billions of animals raised for food are treated. Even in Norway where I live where we are proud to have Cows being as well treated as humans, there has been huge amount of reports and journalistic work showing that reality is very far that what people thought to be true.

2. If they are attacking whole food pant based movement (which is actually the other extreme which there is mounting evidence supports one of the optimal ways of living - add more years to life and life to years), then many of the arguments used are nonsense. Refined sugars, mono crops and all other things mentioned are as against the author view as the whole food plant based diet. There are multiple ways to eat badly and they can be full plant based also :)

3. I always like how large observational studies are dismissed as evidence of what is the best nutrition for humans. Although that’s the only way to find what is best nutrition, because one can’t run a double blinded randomized trial for the entire life and generation of populations. Also RCTs are very focused on reductionism. And the authors like to say that we shouldn’t use reductionism when measuring cows impact on environment, but then they like to use it to prove there is no evidence about plants being optimal diet (btw there is both plenty of RCT and Observational evidence that suggests more plans, less animal implies more and better years in life). But it’s also important to understand no knowledge is definite we keep building how knowledge by looking from different angles. But today based on what I read worst case scenario eating only plants is as good as eating meat and plants. Best case scenario plant predominant diets will lead to longer and better life. (Good summary of most evidence in “The truth about food” book)

But if one removes all the attacks and anti-vegan message as well and the promotion of a paleo diet (and raising even more cows) and the very low trick of scaring people through sensational examples of bad parenting which happen to be vegan and did horrors to their babies nutrition.. there are the things that one can learn/take to start making steps towards better health and environment regardless if one decides to eat animals or not.

Keep in mind that the author says 25% of population is iron deficient.. but remember only a fraction western population are actually non meat eaters. So the problem may mot be the vegan diet, but instead the lack of whole foods in either case :)



If you loved this book I would strongly recommend get the opposite extreme as well through “The China Study” book and the study itself :)

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  • Anonymous User
  • 11-05-21

Good read for anybody considering their diet

This was a great book that lays out many of the misguided arguments about why one should be vegetarian or vegan. Everyone should be free to choose to become vegetarian or vegan but they shouldn't justify them on the basis of the environment, ethics, or nutrition. The book is clear and logical. Great job.

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  • W. Coffey
  • 21-04-21

Not bad.

Nothing thrilling that draws you in, but overall pretty good. I think each side to any argument is going to be bias in choosing what data to present, and this book is no exception, but nothing stood out as blatantly trying to push a false narrative. As someone that has been a meat eater the majority of my life, and lived and grew up in cattle country, but also spent a decent amount of time meat free, I'm pretty open to all opinions. I think this is a good book for presenting information for this side of the argument, but I also encourage people to listen to other arguments and viewpoints as well then make an informed decision for themselves.