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Summary

An eye-opening look at the ways we misjudge risk every day and a guide to making better decisions with our money, health, and personal lives

In the age of Big Data we often believe that our predictions about the future are better than ever before. But as risk expert Gerd Gigerenzer shows, the surprising truth is that in the real world, we often get better results by using simple rules and considering less information.

In Risk Savvy, Gigerenzer reveals that most of us, including doctors, lawyers, financial advisers, and elected officials, misunderstand statistics much more often than we think, leaving us not only misinformed, but vulnerable to exploitation. Yet there is hope. Anyone can learn to make better decisions for their health, finances, family, and business without needing to consult an expert or a super computer, and Gigerenzer shows us how.

Risk Savvy is an insightful and easy-to-understand remedy to our collective information overload and an essential guide to making smart, confident decisions in the face of uncertainty.

©2014 Gerd Gigerenzer (P)2020 Tantor

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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Can't make it past the first 2 minutes.

The narrator sounds like Siri. No personality. It may well be automated - it sounds incredibly robotic. The worst I've heard from Audible

1 person found this helpful

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Fairly average level of content

Really not a fan of the performer's voice. I'm sorry to say that I found it quite whiney and irritating.
I found the content relatively interesting but truly usable little gems of take-away information were pretty limited. Most books of this type I'll listen to 2-3 times in order to get the most out of them. For this one, once was enough and I even skipped some bits which I rarely do.
Finally, it was very US-centric, which further reduced the level of value I could take from it.
Shan't be recommending this one to friends/colleagues

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good book terribly read

this is read in such a mental way. it sounds like a cheap text to speech app.

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fascinating book. robotic narrator

gigerenzer is of the nassim taleb real world risk management school and this is a fascinating book full of useful insights and tips about how to better understand risk and probabilities. I struggled with the narrator however who narrates in something of a monotone.

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  • MJ
  • 25-03-21

Natural Frequencies

And don't bother with health screening unless you're already at risk. Great that justifies my innate hatred of those who use obscure statistics.

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  • Bradley Shaw
  • 02-10-20

Every one needs to understand

This is a crucial book. If we misunderstand stats if has massive impact. Doctors should spend way more time looking at stats than they do. Listen or read to this book then tell me I am wrong.

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  • DEAN
  • 24-08-20

Incredibly appropriate in today’s world

Basically, humans are terrible at assessing risk. The findings are shocking, and my goodness could we save money, lives, and time if only we could execute on half of what this book discusses. Outstanding and should be required reading for High School students.

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 19-06-20

A book everyone should read

The material in this book is absolutely critical to the economic and personal survival of us all.

Every school should have a mandatory course based around the information in this book.

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  • Gang Fang
  • 17-06-20

A long-overdue read

I first heard of Prof Gigerenzer after reading Daniel Kahneman’s Thinking Fast and Slow, which, BTW, changes my way of seeing the world. I was a faithful servant to the “system two thinking” but unfortunately and inevitably, I soon came to the realization that I am fooling myself when I tried to come up with all factors and their weights and values in order to make a decision. In Mr. Gigerenzer’s word:

“In an uncertain world (the real world), simple heuristics trump complex computations for decision making.”

This is a long-overdue read for me because I have been contemplating on the topics of decision-making, behavioral psychology, complexity and design for years now. How to exactly understand the relationship between the forever increasing complexity of the world and the need for simple solutions? Is this a contradiction? Risk savvy gives a satisfactory answer: draw the line between whisk and uncertainty, and then use statistical thinking and rule of thumb correspondingly. Heuristics, which, at the first glance, appears to be oversimplified and less accurate than mathematical models, deliver a good enough result in a much speedy and cost-efficient way. These heuristics, or intuitions, are what experts work so hard to attain and help them win models in sports, mates and contracts. Of course, Kahneman’s warning is still valid here: many of these heuristics are inherited either genetically or culturally and often exploited; hence we need to be able to tell which are useful when.

Some other aspects of the book which I find interesting are the descriptions on the healthcare system and the financial industry. I am surprised by the three factors that those agents are very often act against our best interest: risk illiteracy, defensive medicine and conflict of interests.

Finally even through a fair amount of content in the book I already know, I still find it an interesting and beneficial read because it looks at matters from the perspective of risk and feels very grounded as it provides tips and understanding needed to deal with everyday matters.

I would recommend this book.