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Summary

Highborn and privileged, Valeria has never known life outside her father's Roman fortress. But when Hadrian's Wall falls, Valeria's world shatters.

Ripped from her bed, she's captured by savages. Terrified, she prays her betrothed will mount a rescue. But it is the enemy, a Pict with Celtic tattoos and hair of fire who wields his sword and fights for her freedom.

When she seeks refuge in the warrior's stronghold, the Picts eye her with distrust and force her to earn her keep as a commoner. But the longer Valeria remains, the more agonizing it becomes to conceal her burning love for the Celtic warrior.

Contains mature themes.

©2014 Amy Jarecki (P)2021 Tantor

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  • Camille
  • 02-01-22

Terrible story. Average narration. Not good enough to be on Audible.

Where to begin? This story is supposed to occur in ancient times during the Roman occupation of Britain, but the storyline is crippled by glaring historical inconsistencies. A quick superficial Wikipedia search reveals:

Roman occupation of Britain was from AD 43 to AD 410. Christianity wasn’t the official state religion of Rome until AD 391. The term “Pict” was invented by Roman writers around 297 CE to refer to the different tribes of northern Britain. There was no tribe called the “Picts.” Side-saddles weren’t invented until the late 14th century. The term “milady” wasn’t used in antiquity.

I have listed above a tiny fraction of the inconsistencies throughout this work of fiction. The entire plot collapses under the weight of so many things that could not have existed at the same time. The author insults readers with this junk, and Audible does great damage to any expectations of quality by including this title.