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Summary

Power has a God-given role in human relationships and institutions, but it can lead to abuse when used in unhealthy ways. Speaking into current #MeToo and #ChurchToo conversations, this book shows that the body of Christ desperately needs to understand the forms power takes, how it is abused, and how to respond to abuses of power.

Although many Christians want to prevent abuse in their churches and organizations, they lack a deep and clear-eyed understanding of how power actually works. Internationally recognized psychologist Diane Langberg offers a clinical and theological framework for understanding how power operates, the effects of the abuse of power, and how power can be redeemed and restored to its proper God-given place in relationships and institutions. This book not only helps Christian leaders identify and resist abusive systems, but also shows how they can use power to protect the vulnerable in their midst.

©2020 Diane Langberg (P)2020 eChristian

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A must read for all Pastors

This book was an eye opener and Christ honouring. Anyone in a place of leadership needs to take it in.

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  • Paul Konkol
  • 23-02-21

Chapter on Christendom and Power is Worth Price of Book

This book has line after line of piercing insight into the state of the Church today and over the millennia.

The chapter on Christendom and Power, which highlights the difference between following people and following Christ is 30 minutes that in and of itself is worth the price of the book. And the rest of the book is great, too.

Sometimes I think Langberg creates a false dichotomy between competence in ministry and Christlike character, but this is a small disagreement when considering the overall message of the book.

I thought that there were times the performer (who I thought did a good job overall) tried to mimic male and minority voices. Didn’t totally appreciate that.

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  • Tim Gregg
  • 08-04-21

Impactful!! Get it!!

Slow start but totally worth it. Great insights, on how we should live despite the institutions that prevail.

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  • Laura J. Hunt
  • 26-08-21

Great content; poor exegesis

Overall, the book strengthened my resolve to be a dissenter in a system that so frequently supports the powerful rather than the victims. However the excellent content is cloaked in poor exegesis including the etymological fallacy, illegitimate totality transfer, outdated interpretations such as the supposed sinfulness of the woman in John 4, occasional anti-semitism, and an impossible dichotomy between Christ and culture. Still, I will likely assign chapters 2 & 5 to my students, with appropriate warnings, and perhaps chapters 9-10 to be read devotionally, after which they could be required to create plans for healing, self care, and spiritual growth while pastoring.