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Political Tribes

Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations
By: Amy Chua
Narrated by: Julia Whelan
Length: 7 hrs and 3 mins
Categories: Non-fiction, Politics
4.5 out of 5 stars (4 ratings)

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Summary

The best-selling author of Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, Yale Law School professor Amy Chua, offers a bold new prescription for reversing our foreign policy failures and overcoming our destructive political tribalism at home

Humans are tribal. We need to belong to groups. In many parts of the world, the group identities that matter most - the ones that people will kill and die for - are ethnic, religious, sectarian, or clan-based. But because America tends to see the world in terms of nation-states engaged in great ideological battles - capitalism vs. communism, democracy vs. authoritarianism, the "free world" vs. the "axis of evil" - we are often spectacularly blind to the power of tribal politics. Time and again this blindness has undermined American foreign policy.

In the Vietnam War, viewing the conflict through Cold War blinders, we never saw that most of Vietnam's "capitalists" were members of the hated Chinese minority. Every pro-free-market move we made helped turn the Vietnamese people against us. In Iraq we were stunningly dismissive of the hatred between that country's Sunnis and Shias. If we want to get our foreign policy right - so as to not be perpetually caught off guard and fighting unwinnable wars - the United States has to come to grips with political tribalism abroad.

Just as Washington's foreign policy establishment has been blind to the power of tribal politics outside the country, so, too, have American political elites been oblivious to the group identities that matter most to ordinary Americans - and that are tearing the United States apart. As the stunning rise of Donald Trump laid bare, identity politics have seized both the American left and right in an especially dangerous, racially inflected way. In America today every group feels threatened: whites and blacks, Latinos and Asians, men and women, liberals and conservatives, and so on. There is a pervasive sense of collective persecution and discrimination. On the left, this has given rise to increasingly radical and exclusionary rhetoric of privilege and cultural appropriation. On the right, it has fueled a disturbing rise in xenophobia and white nationalism.

In characteristically persuasive style, Amy Chua argues that America must rediscover a national identity that transcends our political tribes. Enough false slogans of unity, which are just another form of divisiveness. It is time for a more difficult unity that acknowledges the reality of group differences and fights the deep inequities that divide us.

©2018 Amy Chua (P)2018 Penguin Audio

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    3 out of 5 stars

Good in parts, but patchy

Some thoughfull chapters that can generate good debates, but rather descriptive and journalistic, like an extended newspaper article.

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  • Bryanoutside
  • 15-03-18

Revelatory.

In light of the 2016 election, I have really struggled to make sense of the emerging extremes within American society. I have spent the last year and a half consuming all the literature I can on evolutionary psychology and tribalism and been inundated with information to the point that it has become hard to articulate much with clarity. This book however does a wonderful job weaving a simple narrative that explains what is gnawing at the American soul. Amy Chua has done a wonderful job presenting concrete examples with a strong scientific foundation in a practical way that everyone can understand. If you care or are concerned at all about the state of the United States, I highly recommend this book, it was an insightful and thoroughly enjoyable read.

5 people found this helpful

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  • Kay
  • 16-08-19

Excellent for the most part

Excellent job for the most part. But at the end dropped the ball on analyzing Trump by revealing liberal bias. Didn’t completely grasp why he won but came to liberal talking points. By the way I am black. I would have given 5 stars if not for the poor handling of the latter.

1 person found this helpful

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  • debbiedarline
  • 03-08-19

Phenomally helpful for understanding "others”

I loved the way that Amy showed examples from both the conservative point of view and the liberal point of view. I was given this book by my conservative sister in law and I generally lean liberal.
I learned so much about why we love our own tribes and why we think about politics the way that we do.
The narrator (Julia) did a great job making somewhat dry and complicated content sound dynamic and interesting.

1 person found this helpful

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  • T. Michels
  • 25-04-18

Thought provoking

a great listen. well performed. thought provoking. would recommend. why require a minimum number of words, dumb.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Grumpy412
  • 24-03-18

Great book.

A good explanation of why we are the way we are. I'm still not going to hug a GOP person.

6 people found this helpful

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  • Kelli G.
  • 15-11-19

A must!

Every American should listen to this book. And then, listen to, understand, and respect each other.

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  • Dave
  • 08-10-19

Highly Enlightening

This explains why our foreign policy has been such a mess for so long. Very enlightening!

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  • RGO
  • 05-06-19

Everyone must read this book!

Wow! As my slightly teary-eyes dry from the final poem... I want to shoutout from the roof tops, “READ THIS BOOK!”

And now a vulnerable confession, this listen too longer than usual, why? I didn’t want to hear parts of me, that I don’t want to be! That’s what makes this such a great read!

No one is safe... we all are at fault and as soon as we stop pointing our fingers or gaze outwardly, we need to stare at ourselves first. It reminds me of this famous quote:

“Yesterday I was clever, so I wanted to change the world. Today I am wise, so I am changing myself.”
—Jalaluddin Mevlana Rumi

This fabulous insightful and cleverly written thesis my just might be the answer we all are looking for, to calm our instinctive natures.

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  • daydream
  • 12-05-19

hard truths

there are some hard truths to deal with in this book. I enjoyed the reader.

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  • Jessica Reyer
  • 16-04-19

Interesting Read

I like the concepts presented. I like that there is not blame or finger pointing. Rather, a difference in perspectives defined by the labels we pit upon our selves.