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One-Way Ticket

Nine Lives on Two Wheels
Narrated by: Jonathan Vaughters
Length: 10 hrs
4.5 out of 5 stars (26 ratings)

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Summary

One Way Ticket is the story of a man and modern cycling.

Jonathan Vaughters is one of the leading figures in world cycling, a record-breaking mountain climber, Tour de France stage winner and former teammate to Lance Armstrong. He is now manager and influential figurehead of the renowned Education First World Tour team.

In One-Way Ticket: Nine Lives and Two Wheels he describes a journey from driven teenage prodigy, travelling to races in the back of his dad's station wagon, to an obsessive determination to make it big in European racing - whatever the cost. He tells the story of his transformation from poacher to gamekeeper, detailing his painful decision to finally come clean about his own descent into doping - and to persuade others to do likewise - by providing more than enough shocking testimony to USADA (US Anti-Doping Agency) to explode the Armstrong myth.

Working in collaboration with Jeremy Whittle, former cycling correspondent to The Times, now writing for The Guardian, Vaughters reveals the ease with which, his illusions shattered, he walked away from European racing. He documents his own suffering in races, the trials of establishing a team and mentoring young riders, and the dizzying highs of success in races such as the Tour de France, Giro d'Italia and Paris-Roubaix.

Vaughters' long and winding road mirrors that of cycling itself, as this compelling but troubled sport still struggles, after years of scandal, to restore its credibility. Along the way, he shares his unique experience to lift the lid on a world he has both loathed and loved, detailing the fights and fall-outs with cycling's leading figures, including Lance Armstrong, Pat McQuaid, Johan Bruyneel, Bradley Wiggins and Dave Brailsford.

©2019 Jonathan James Vaughters (P)2019 Quercus Editions Limited

What members say

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Cycling transparency

A really good insight into the man and the world of pro-cycling. I have read many similar books but this is the best and possibly the most complete and honest account.
GREAT READ👍

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really enjoyed it

A excellent book with enlightening details that bring the struggle of conflict alive., Jonathans narration really makes a difference. we need more author narrators

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Engaging and revealing, but still questions

I really enjoyed this book and was gripped. There were some interesting revelations, but I felt that he struggled to fully open up in the way that riders like Thomas Dekker and Tyler Hamilton have done. Crucially I didn't feel that he provided enough reasoning or evidence for why he thinks cycling is now clean. He also didn't tackle motor doping. So I was still left with a lot of questions.

I also found the level of detail sporadic. There was a lot of information about his childhood and formative years. However, by comparison I felt that there was relatively limited attention paid to some very significant events, such as his team winning the Giro, which I found surprising. I also felt that there was insufficient information about the current state of professional cycling and issues such as TUEs and motor doping.


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Good listen

An autobiography read by the author - added a extra dimension. At times JW seemed bored reading his own words. Listening to someone earnestly telling you a story about how they repeatedly misrepresented the truth while appearing earnest makes you pause, listen and consider. The book is all the better for this and represents a step up from the mondane.

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Shame

Story had some interesting insights (eg around Wiggins in 2009) but wish JV had got someone else to narrate.