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One Long Night

A Global History of Concentration Camps
Narrated by: Andrea Pitzer
Length: 14 hrs and 8 mins
Categories: History, Military
5 out of 5 stars (3 ratings)

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Summary

A groundbreaking, haunting, and profoundly moving history of modernity's greatest tragedy: concentration camps

For over 100 years, at least one concentration camp has existed somewhere on Earth. First used as battlefield strategy, camps have evolved with each passing decade, in the scope of their effects and the savage practicality with which governments have employed them. Even in the 21st century, as we continue to reckon with the magnitude and horror of the Holocaust, history tells us we have broken our own solemn promise of "never again".

In this harrowing work based on archival records and interviews during travel to four continents, Andrea Pitzer reveals for the first time the chronological and geopolitical history of concentration camps. Beginning with 1890s Cuba, she pinpoints concentration camps around the world and across decades. From the Philippines and Southern Africa in the early 20th century to the Soviet Gulag and detention camps in China and North Korea during the Cold War, camp systems have been used as tools for civilian relocation and political repression. Often justified as a measure to protect a nation or even the interned groups themselves, camps have instead served as brutal and dehumanizing sites that have claimed the lives of millions.

Drawing from exclusive testimony, landmark historical scholarship, and stunning research, Andrea Pitzer unearths the roots of this appalling phenomenon, exploring and exposing the staggering toll of the camps: our greatest atrocities, the extraordinary survivors, and even the intimate, quiet moments that have also been part of camp life during the past century.

©2017 Andrea Pitzer (P)2017 Hachette Audio

Critic reviews

"A clear-eyed and powerful exposure of the horrors of concentration camps, not just the ones we know about but the ones we've overlooked or ignored. The lengths Andrea Pitzer went to research and report this book prove revelatory." (Annie Jacobsen, author of the Pulitzer Prize finalist The Pentagon's Brain)
"In this engrossing history, Pitzer traces the origins of concentration camps and follows their development over more than a century.... Pitzer excels at focusing this sprawling history on the personal level." ( Publishers Weekly )

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Profile Image for Phillip James Weber
  • Phillip James Weber
  • 06-08-19

Striking, Personal and Impressive

With an excellent narration this book leads you to an understanding of the origins of concentration camps, extra-lawful mass detention, while weaving together the personal stories within them and national narratives that bring them about time after time.

My personal take away was that the uninformed on this issue cannot be expected to imagine the human suffering that continued ignorance of concentration camps and their modern incarnations cause. A problem that perennially allows for the human cost of supporting these institutions to be underestimated.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Profile Image for wmorrison
  • wmorrison
  • 04-07-19

Important subject. Horrible narration.

I have nearly a thousand Audible titles, mostly non-fiction. As far as i can recall there has only been one or two that I found to be unlistenable. Here's another.

I heard the author being interviewed on podcast "WHAT IS HAPPENING?" with Chris Hayes. I wanted more information. This is a thorough study of an important subject. The history, information and insights presented are extremely important and relate to the political morality of the last century right up to today. Everyone should read this.

I have several favorite narrators that I know will always deliver a wonderful performance. There are also a few that I avoid. I approach author read titles cautiously. Some authors tend toward over dramatization while others seem bored by their subject having spent years researching and writing.

This is one of the worst performances I have heard on Audible. Ms Pitzer's voice is clear and precise. Her cadence is terrible. I felt I was listening to an eighth grader read from a history text book for the first time, flat delivery, excessive pauses, a sing-song up or down pitch at the end of most sentences.There was no investment in the subject matter. I found it unbearable.

This is not Ms Pitzer's fault. She is not a professional reader. She has a pleasant, clear voice.The fault must fall to the Audible producer. I wonder if the producer even listened to the book. If they did and approved this performance then Audible should take a close look at this producer. I hope before release Audible has titles reviewed, listened to completely, by at least a few people. Listening to this title I suspect that is not the case. Someone, most I feel, would have said "whoa... this sucks."

I doubt I will be able to finish this audio book. It is an important study of an important subject. I will buy the print version. I would urge everyone to read the book. This stuff matters. I would like to see the Audible producer / editor listed in the credits. I imagine that people who listen to many books would find they have favorite producers just as they have favorite narrators. Most of the professional narrators (and actors) do a very good job. Audible should take extra care and devote extra coaching to non-professional readers, especially author readers.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Profile Image for Nely Satner
  • Nely Satner
  • 25-08-19

Get the Hard Copy

If you wanna history of concentration camps this is your book. Guantánamo Bay was especially interesting. The reason I say get the hard copy is because the author jumps from Guantánamo to Africa or from Africa to Great Britain or just it was a little confusing but very interesting

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Profile Image for Dustin Kelley
  • Dustin Kelley
  • 14-08-19

Important Book!

Note: One reviewer recommended avoiding the audio version because of terrible narration. I've certainly heard better, but also many worse. She does a serviceable self-narration.

Andrea Pitzer provides a necessary history of the world’s concentration camps. These recent inventions (she argues beginning during in Cuba prior to the Spanish-American War) are camps where civilians are separated from the rest of society without due process and where those held lack most freedoms. It is important to read about acts of dehumanization in both our past and present in order to right errors now and hopefully prevent/limit future atrocities. This book is paced well and its mostly chronological order helps in keeping things straight. Guantanamo Bay’s current camp is the book’s nexus, serving as both the introduction and final chapter.

I was unaware that the term “concentration camp” pre-dated the Holocaust. It was fascinating (and angering and depressing) to learn about the various camps employed during the two World Wars and other more regional conflicts. The chapter on Chile and Argentina provided mostly new (to me) information. I’d known about concerns related to communism, but not about a camp in a large soccer stadium (Santiago). Chapters on Cuba, Kenya and Myanmar are also impactful.

Pitzer quotes journalists who during various wars risked their lives and/or societal standing to visit camps and report on their abuses. Emily Hobhouse’s work during the Boer War was especially notable. A great reminder to get involved.

Pitzer certainly made choices as to what to include. Some have argued for greater inclusion of war camps or refugee camps. She certainly alludes to both and also notes that various camps encompass a variety of definitions. Ultimately, I applaud her choices.

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Profile Image for Christopher J Kaczmarski
  • Christopher J Kaczmarski
  • 20-02-19

Wish i could get my money back

i was looking forward to this historic piece, but was quickly disappointed. The author clearly lays out her political views above the thesis of this book. Guantanamo Bay is not a concentration camp... funny how just bc you can oppose something, you can relabel it to fuel your agenda. Stopped reading half way through book, though I tried....

0 of 14 people found this review helpful