Listen free for 30 days

£7.99/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime

Summary

"The wall was the ambition, the style became the obsession."

In the autumn of 1982, a single stone fell from high on the south face of Annapurna and struck Alex MacIntyre on the head, killing him instantly and robbing the climbing world of one of its greatest talents. Although only 28 years old, Alex was already one of the leading figures of British mountaineering's most successful era. His ascents included hard new routes on Himalayan giants like Dhaulagiri and Changabang and a glittering record of firsts in the Alps and Andes. 

Yet how Alex climbed was as important as what he climbed. He was a mountaineering prophet, sharing with a handful of contemporaries - including his climbing partner Voytek Kurtyka - the vision of a purer form of alpinism on the world's highest peaks. 

One Day as a Tiger, John Porter's revelatory and poignant memoir of his friend Alex MacIntyre, shows mountaineering at its extraordinary best and tragic worst - and draws an unforgettable picture of a dazzling, argumentative and exuberant legend.

©2014 John Porter (P)2019 Vertebrate Publishing

What listeners say about One Day as a Tiger

Average customer ratings
Overall
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    6
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    3
  • 4 Stars
    3
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    4
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Good for mountaineers

One Day as a Tiger By John Porter and narrated by Stewart Crank is a medley of genres encompassing mountaineering history and culture focussed through the life of Alex MacIntyre.

Stewart Crank is well enunciated, with good cadence and emphasis. There is a subtle use of accents to discern between various speakers, however it can be difficult to follow quotes and discern different speakers at times. There is a sentence roughly half way through in chapter 22 where the narrator makes a mistake on the word 'twang', and has to restart the sentence. I'm.assuming this was meant to be edited out but was forgotten/missed.

From the outset there is drama and a sense of 'old-school' and changed times. Straight into the action, One Day as a Tiger is not really something you can sit and listen to in the background - it deserves and requires atyention, and keeps you hooked with both smiles and laughter, but also with hints of the darker sides of life, that makes you stop and think, and appreciate it all just that little bit more.

With some very visual descriptions, it is best if the listener has some knowledge and understanding of the basics of climbing and mountaineering, otherwise some enthusiasm may be lost through the use of specific terms and assumptions of knowledge. But for those with an interest in recent mountaineering history, One Day as a Tiger can really be a fascinating listen.

The quote on Macintyre's tomb (the first line of which is the title of the book) is fitting, and definitely makes you think. Discussion around his death and his vision and passion for life is fascinating, heartfelt and rather emotional. Macintyre's predictions were uncanny and ultimately true. He really seemed a young man ahead of his time, and it becomes clear why this book celebrates his short life, whilst also paying homage to some of the other incredible mountaineers and their exceptional achievements over the years.

The description of Macintyre and his life and outlook is very respectable, and something of a motivator to change and better oneself too. The readings of Macintyre's articles give an idea of just how articulate and reflective he was as an individual, and help put context to the comments regarding his life and the other various accomplishments in mountaineering history referred to here.

With interesting and informative discussion around Bonnington and large expeditions, along with the BMC, policies and education, and even relationships, definitely a good listen to learn about the foundations of light and fast alpinism.

1 person found this helpful