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No Nonsense

The Autobiography
Narrated by: Joey Barton
Length: 10 hrs and 21 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (823 ratings)

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Summary

So, you think you know Joey Barton. Think again.

No Nonsense is a game-changing autobiography which will redefine the most fascinating figure in British football. It is the raw yet redemptive story of a man shaped by rejection and the consequences of his mistakes. He has represented England and been a pivotal player for Manchester City, Newcastle United, Queens Park Rangers, Marseille, Burnley and Glasgow Rangers, but his career has featured recurring controversy. The low point of being sent to prison for assault in 2008 proved to be the catalyst for the reevaluation of his life.

No Nonsense reflects Barton's character - it is candid, challenging, entertaining and intelligent. He does not spare himself in revealing the formative influences of a tough upbringing in Liverpool and gives a survivor's insight into a game which, to use his phrase, 'eats people alive'. The audiobook is emotionally driven and explains how he has redirected his energies since the birth of his children. In addition to dealing with his past, he expands on his plans for the future. In this updated edition he speaks frankly about the gambling addiction that has left him facing a hefty ban. The millions who follow his commentaries on social media and those who witnessed him on BBC's Question Time will be given another reason to pause, and look beyond the caricature.

©2017 Joey Barton (P)2017 Simon & Schuster Audio UK

What members say

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  • 24-11-17

Needless to say I had the last laugh

I must point out that I am not a fan of Joey Barton but thought it might be an interesting listening but the longer I listen the more I kept on thinking this was like listening to Alan Partridges fictional autobiography 'Bouncing Back'.

Telling story of how he beat team mates/general public with no real remorse, just blaming his upbringing and social groups but all with the backdrop of 'needless to say...I had the last laugh'. I wouldn't recommend.

23 people found this helpful

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not a great read

basically tells you how great he is and he never got to his heights because people judged him as a thug.....but he always battled on. basically that's the story

8 people found this helpful

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Painful listening

Nothing ever his fault and him trying so hard to pass of how intelligent he is .

Avoid

24 people found this helpful

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Brilliant and Honest Account

Joe Barton gets a lot of stick and some of it rightly deserved. But there are two sides to every story and he is brutally honest in this book, for better or for worse. Without a doubt, anyone who wants to judge him must read this first to have any credibility in their views. I found this book fascinating and gripping. Highly recommended.

3 people found this helpful

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a good insight into the man

it was a good book, helped with him reading it but he seemed to over do the elaboration sometimes and became tedious in places but nevertheless a good read

2 people found this helpful

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Interesting and engaging

A really good listen, and an even better chance to hear all of those infamous stories from the authors point of view.

2 people found this helpful

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A great listen

Great insight into the minset of a complicated, determined and resilient professional. Also very motivational for anyone with a desire to continuously improve both professionally and personally. The only improvement would have been Joey to go into more detail about his drink and gambling problems as opposed to merely making reference to them as reasons behind his behaviour. Minor point though. But overall, a great audiobook.

2 people found this helpful

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A decent listen

I found the early part of the book describing his formative years very interesting. There were also some interesting stories of his career, time in jail and family. Towards the latter part of the book where he talks about himself, his attitude and his general thoughts I found my mind wondering a little and didn't think those parts were particularly engaging.

2 people found this helpful

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honest, cringy and enthralling.

He moves from being a dislikeable kn*b, to an alright knob. Great insight to the world of pro football. Made my recent trips up and down the M6 more interesting- enjoyable listen.

2 people found this helpful

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Inside the mind of a serial-troublemaker

Where does No Nonsense rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Pretty high up. An interesting and entertaining book written and read by Joey himself. An honest account of his life. It's easy to listen to and flows well. Quite revealing about his upbringing and career in football. Overall he comes across as a man still fighting his demons. When he's not fighting them, then he usually finds someone else to fight. When you listen you get the impression of someone who has made mistakes, learnt from them and grown as a person. However as he appears to lurch from one self-inflicted crisis to another you can't help question if he has really grown/learnt much or if the appearance of maturity is just an image that he has learn't to portray to gain attention or respect. Similarly he has a tendency to play the victim quite readily, and he has a habit of complaining about a lot (the government, his community, facilities, family, the world in general.....) without suggesting anything constructive to improve things. He also has that child-like outlook of being anti-authority but never seems to have demonstrated any evidence of seeking much responsibility himself. A very self-centred man but still interesting to understand how his mind works.

Who was your favorite character and why?

The book is about Joey. He comes across as honest, opinionated and a man (possibly man-child) still on a journey. At times he appears insightful although he does have a tendency to be highly judgemental of other people but very sensitive and defensive if anyone has criticised or crossed him. The book details many of his ups and downs from his point of view. He is no sheep but hasn't seemed to use his questioning and restless nature to actually improve things. Very critical of managers, other players, people in general but never someone so far who has stepped up to the mark himself in life to hold any position of any great responsibility or authority. Comes across of a bit of an idealist who perhaps has an over inflated view of his own intellect. He's obviously not stupid but many of his thinking shows a bit of logic and reasoning but lacks deeper and more complex thought and reasoning. Maybe this will come in time although maybe not.

What about Joey Barton’s performance did you like?

The book is helped by Joey reading the story. It feels more authentic that he is telling his story and this enhances the listening experience.

Any additional comments?

Overall a good book, easy to listen to, helps to understand what makes him tick. I enjoyed listening to the book and appreciate the author's honesty in him telling his story. Hope he does wise up and mature over time, learns to count to 10 more before acting and uses his energy to help others more in time. If he learns to spend less energy complaining and uses this energy in a leadership role, he eventually may end up OK. I have to admit I'm left with the impression that he will likely not want to let go of his 'play the victim' comfort blanket I question how reformed he is willing or able to be.

2 people found this helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 22-01-20

A great book.. a book that challenges your preconceived idea of Joey Barton.

A great audio book, as one of many people who have had / have a negative preconceived idea of Joey Barton this audio book challenges any negative thought process we all have.. You like me would apologize to Joey Barton for having such a wrongly negative ideology of him. Listen to the book and understand the complexed life he grew up in. Honestly you will enjoy the book.. Fleetwood town you are lucky to have him as a manager... Newcastle you where lucky to have him as a player and a loyal advocate even though you treat him as a c u next Tuesday (hard to say coming form a Sunderland fan)