Regular price: £26.29

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – choose any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • Free, unlimited access to Audio Shows
  • After your trial, Audible is just £7.99/month
OR
In Basket

Summary

What is autism: a devastating developmental condition, a lifelong disability, or a naturally occurring form of cognitive difference akin to certain forms of genius?

In truth it is all of these things and more - and the future of our society depends on our understanding it. Following on from his groundbreaking article 'The Geek Syndrome', Wired reporter Steve Silberman unearths the secret history of autism, long suppressed by the same clinicians who became famous for discovering it, and finds surprising answers to the crucial question of why the number of diagnoses has soared in recent years.

Going back to the earliest autism research and chronicling the brave and lonely journey of autistic people and their families through the decades, Silberman provides long-sought solutions to the autism puzzle while casting light on the growing movement of 'neurodiversity' and mapping out a path towards a more humane world for people with learning differences.

©2016 Steve Silberman (P)2016 Audible, Ltd

What members say

Average customer ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    106
  • 4 Stars
    32
  • 3 Stars
    8
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    2

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    99
  • 4 Stars
    29
  • 3 Stars
    7
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    2

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    99
  • 4 Stars
    30
  • 3 Stars
    7
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    0
Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A journey through the history of autism.

Many parent who have newly diagnosed autistic sons or daughters are at the beginning of a journey with their child to optimise their life chances. There are courses on offer and 'expert specialists' who can advise us, but where did the culture of diagnosis and treatments available develop and what precipitates their development. This book will help anyone develop an understanding of some of the challenges faced by families with autistic members. The book also charts the political, social and economic influences that have shaped what we recognise as autism today. As an autistic person and mother of two autistic children reading this book, it is wonderful to hear that resources are moving away from curing or eradicating to focus on support to integrate people affected by autism into a health daily life. Lorna Wing and Asperger emerge with Temple Grandin as the heroes of this book, I think they are also my heroes.
The book is more approachable to read than some academic works and offers an over view of some of the theories surrounding autism. Not shying away from the darker days of the Second World War in Europe and how many young children were murdered because of their disability, it is at time challenging but well worth reading.

10 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Varied and informative.

Much easier to listen to than it was to read. Includes examples of successful autists while also showing those individuals who, along with their families struggle the most and their challenges and successes. Demonstrates how guidelines for the diagnosis have evolved and why. With an interesting look at those involved such as Leo Kanner, Hans Asperger, Lorna Wing, Wakefield and many other lesser known.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

I have my answers at last

I consider this book so important that I've just bought several copies to give to other parents of children with autism. This is a "must" read!

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

informative and well written

What made the experience of listening to Neurotribes the most enjoyable?

this is a good piece of well researched journalism. Steve is sympathetic and optimistic and has a way of structuring his points which its difficult to argue with( though not impossible)

this is a detailed history of Autism, dispelling the epidemic theory, and advocating acceptance and a celebration of diversity

Who was your favorite character and why?

lol... Asperger

What about William Hope’s performance did you like?

really well read,

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

it definitely has it's moments

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • R
  • 26-05-18

This an excellent detailed history of Autism.

This nook is worth the read! had it on my book case for a while in paper but could not get the chance to read it, when it came on audible I was really pleased! worth the time to listen to properly.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Excellent history of autism

This book gives an in depth history of autism and autism spectrum disorders. Highly recommend.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

superb

an amazing epic . harrowing in places. thank god for silberman what a well researched interesting book

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lucy Giles
  • Exeter, Devon United Kingdom
  • 09-02-18

Seminal

This is a book that badly needed to be written. Meticulously researched and bringing the strength of good journalism - objectivity - to bear. Silberman charts the history of Autism. In its spectrum, it has been the subject of a spectrum of responses to its singularity: from the sublime to the ridiculous. It’s also a book with a soul - its message : a call for greater understanding, acceptance and collaboration by all neurotribes of the Earth. For the greater good in a changing world. The story of Autism continues to unfold and there is a way to go.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

very informative

great background reading about autism. from early psychology to current thinking. well worth a read.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

An essential text for anyone interest in autism.

Steve Silberman lays out the development of our understanding of autism, from its early days when it was considered an ivisibly rare pathology, to the current day, where aour understanding of its various flavours is starting to develop, and artists are finally starting to be acknowledged as the people who can best explain what it is like to be autistic.

Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 14-08-18

So you think Autism is a recent invention?

A fascinating and thoroughly readable deep dive into the roots and history of autism through stories. Some stories made me angry - we have not always treated those who are different well - some made me laugh, some made me go 'ahh, that explains it'. I especially enjoyed the section on how those who have been diagnosed are taking ownership of the way autism is perceived and changing the focus from cure to support and community.
For most, this is a book to be read in sections overtime as it is a huge amount of information to process. The writing and the narration are both very easy to work with and not at all like listening to a text book. The author is a journalist after all.
I highly recommend this book to anyone who works with or knows someone or is on the spectrum.