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Summary

Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645) was arguably the greatest swordsman who ever lived, a legendary figure whose methods of thought and strategy have been studied and adopted across a wide spectrum of society, from martial artists to military leaders to captains of industry. The iconic sword saint of Japan was clearly a genius, yet he was also a functional psychopath - ruthless, fearless, hyper-focused, and utterly without conscience. Shortly before he died, Musashi wrote down his final thoughts about life for his favorite student Terao Magonojo to whom Go Rin No Sho, his famous Book of Five Rings, had also been dedicated. He called this treatise Dokkodo, which translates as, "The Way of Walking Alone".

This treatise contains Musashi's original 21 precepts of the Dokkodo along with five different interpretations of each passage written from the viewpoints of a monk (Wilder), a warrior (Burrese), a teacher (Smedley), an insurance executive (Christensen), and a businessman (Kane). Each contributor has taken a divergent path from the others, yet shares the commonality of being a lifelong martial practitioner and published author. In this fashion you are not just hearing a simple translation of Musashi's writing, you are scrutinizing his final words for deeper meaning. In them are enduring lessons for how to lead a successful and meaningful life.

©2015 Lawrence Kane & Kris Wilder (P)2017 Lawrence Kane & Kris Wilder

What listeners say about Musashi's Dokkodo

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Not what I expected

To be honest, I may be being overly critical but I feel that a book with Musashi in the title qould talk about the myth and fantastical stories of the Japanese swordsman. This goes on to explain about him being a real man who was abused as a child and ran from home etc. I couldn't even bring myself to listen to this for an hour. It may be incredible but if a book doesn't grab me quickly it loses me; this book was not worth a credit in my opinion.

Lesson learned, always listen to the sample before purchase.

4 people found this helpful

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Profile Image for Erik Neuciler
  • Erik Neuciler
  • 15-10-19

Not Musashis words

it's literally just a bunch of bad analogies from some dude in modern times. a total waste of my money when I only wanted a decent translation of Musashis words.

11 people found this helpful

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  • othuke davidson alomor
  • 15-08-19

if there is 0 start or minus 5..

this the most useless book ever on audible.. is like using a screen reader to reading from your phone screen totally waste of money .. time and audible star... if you see this review before downloading this book plz don't it nothing like the sample u listen to

7 people found this helpful

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  • Anonymous User
  • 05-10-20

Rip off

Books a rip off. Less musashi and more white guy relating dokkodo to car insurance pretend philosophy crap.

4 people found this helpful

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  • $teve A
  • 24-05-19

opinionated rubbish

Found this tome irritating. It has little to do with "The Way of Walking Alone" and a lot to do with the authors' various expositions concerning Musashi, who is herein labeled as psychopath compared to serial killers like the Zodiac Killer. I mean, really? These interpretations, as they are called, concerning Musashi's precepts are rubbish, though somebody might enjoy this waste of space if they require the opinions of others in order to draw their own conclusions. Enough said.

11 people found this helpful

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  • John
  • 29-06-21

Terrible book with no basis

Narrator fails at pronousing even the basic of Japanese words. Instead of getting the book of what Musashi wrote instead we get some random thoughts of another who has no basis or truth on claims or suggestions. Waste of a credit.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 28-06-21

Need to look more beyond the direct translation.

Overall, it was worth the time. It was cool to hear different takes and arguments on the 21 precepts. My largest criticism would be that none of the contributors understand the nuance and meaning behind the Japanese language that is used in Dokkodou beyond the direct translations. There were many instances of disagreement with Musashi where it felt weird for me since the criticism and the original document was not mutually exclusive in certain ideas.

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  • Kannon
  • 19-06-21

Ambitious analysis, poor narration.

If one overlooks the obvious bias with which the authors make commentary on Musashi's precepts, this is an insightful analysis of his precepts colored by modern day beliefs. This should be the way to understand this book. It is not a historic analysis per se. All in all, nice to listen to these viewpoints.

However, the narrator stumbles so often on the words with mispronunciations of even common English words that one wonders if he even tried. Terribly distracting, but it shouldn't dissuade the enthusiastic martial artist from listening anyway.

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  • CW M
  • 30-05-21

They butchered this book

It’s disingenuous to sell this as Musashi’s Dokkodo. I wanted Dokkodo uninterrupted. I didn’t want the narrators opinion every few minutes.

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  • Alexander
  • 28-04-21

clicking

the CONSTANT clicking of the narrator's computer or prompter or whatever is irritating to no end

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  • Not you
  • 27-04-21

Not bad. There are better

There are some good points made by the author. I felt the narrator made it mote enjoyable. How a person reads a book out loud can make the experience more enjoyable.