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Mistshore

Forgotten Realms: Ed Greenwood Presents Waterdeep, Book 2
Narrated by: James Patrick Cronin
Length: 10 hrs and 41 mins
2.5 out of 5 stars (2 ratings)

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Summary

Violence and Magic in the Streets of Waterdeep!

Icelin thought she had escaped the horrors of her past - until they come hunting her, forcing her to go to ground. But when things go from bad to worse, and her friends start paying for her mistakes, Icelin learns she has to embrace the talents she fears, accept the past she runs from, and confront those threatening her future.

Ed Greenwood, beloved author and creator of the Forgotten Realms, presents the second book in a brand-new series dedicated to showcasing both the City of Splendors and our most talented up-and-coming authors. A series of stand-alone adventurers, this book and the series to which it belongs are an excellent entry point for new readers interested in the Forgotten Realms.

©2008 Wizards of the Coast LLC (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

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Profile Image for Jennifer E. Johnson
  • Jennifer E. Johnson
  • 01-09-16

Definitely a D&D Novel

What did you like best about Mistshore? What did you like least?

I feel the need to write a review in response to the Mistshore by Jake, who obviously stopped listening as soon as he judged it to be a romance novel. It's not even remotely a romance novel. The scene he is referencing is very early in the book, and if he had kept listening, he would have found virtually no romance in the book. The pursuit of the protagonist is not at all for romantic reasons, but you'd have to get through the whole book to learn the antagonist's true motivation. And if you do get even a quarter through the book, you'll see it's very much a D&D novel. Adventure, monsters, magic, and mayhem is the theme of the day. There is not even one romance scene in the book. Mild implied romantic tension in a couple fleeting places, Maybe.That said, the novel is adequate at best. Not that I expect much of a D&D novel. It was fun, and if you are interested in hearing stories in the Forgotten Realms setting of Waterdeep, this book does the job.

Did James Patrick Cronin do a good job differentiating all the characters? How?

James Patrick Cronin has a clear and articulate narration style, but I find him a little awkward with characterization. He definitely differentiates characters, but in a very contrived way. The protagonist has an Irish accent, her companion has a Texan accent, the evil elves have French accents, and so on. I heard him narrate Blackstaff Tower and similarly found that he often employs contrived accents and voice nuances that, while differentiating, doesn't particularly fit the world or the characters. He also pronounces Forgotten Realms place names in a way that I've never heard anyone who plays D&D in the universe pronounce them. Since he's an *official* reader I'd almost think his pronunciations should be canon, but since he also oddly pronounces other random words from the English language, I tend to think the pronunciation errors are his. I find myself wishing he would be put to work under the author's guidance (and maybe he is for all I know, but it sure doesn't sound that way to this reader.)

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Profile Image for Reginald Salyer
  • Reginald Salyer
  • 10-10-19

great tool for waterdeep lore!

really brought to life waterdeep and it's mysteries for a campaign I'm writing. t y

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Profile Image for Ian LeViness
  • Ian LeViness
  • 05-12-18

Excellent flow, sympathetic characters, great villain

Overall, this story was a surprise in the best possible way. The characters keep you hooked until the end. The narrator is excellent and uses great voices for each character. The story flows very well and has informative flashbacks as it goes. The ending is quite satisfying, but I won't give it away. You should definitely read this if you are about to do a dungeons and dragons campaign in Waterdeep.

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Profile Image for Cecil & Soren Wollenberg
  • Cecil & Soren Wollenberg
  • 20-11-18

A Quaint List of Ideas

People always look about for "Must Reads!"
This tale isn't that. It offers nothing essential to anybody, but is simply a charming snapshot of a part of the beloved Forgotten Realms. Indeed, though the book takes place in the famous city of Waterdeep, only little of importance relating to the city in question is given beyond; "Mistshore is a sh*tty place."

No. This book isn't a Must Read. It isn't a Realms-shaking tale of epic heroes and warring gods. But what it is, is a small story, about simple people simly trying to live with their traumas in a world filled with chaos and malevolent intent.
Mistshore, both the book and the place, is about good people whom society has given up on and simply want to be rid of.
The book is a story about people, and as a result, the narrator goes the extra mile to try and keep everyone distinct. As a result, the book offers the novel experience of having a female protagonist given an Irish accent, while another speaks like a Cowboy. The dynamic of the narrators voicework does much to bring this small and often-times-confusing story to life, keeping the listener invested in the fates of its scarred heroes.

Due to the book being a small story, it gets to play around with several small but interesting ideas for the fans of the Forgotten Realms to experience; such as how the memorization of Wizardly spells function, and what influence a deity has over the world even after its death.

Mistshore isn't a Must Read. But it is a wonderful and emotional tale of what life can be like in the Forgotten Realms, showing of what a diverse a fantasy world it truly is and can be.

The book is not required, but highly and warmly recommended.

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  • Christopher S Wiley
  • 23-09-17

love this series!

I highly recommend it it is very engaging and captivating storyline. you become invested in the characters.

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Profile Image for Jake
  • Jake
  • 11-04-13

I give it 1 star as a D&D novel

Any additional comments?

More Romance novel than D&D

Seems to me this is Romance genera or you might stretch to say it is what the Fantasy genera has been mostly turned into. A guy stumbles across the daughter of a woman he desired beyond reason in a small town. He must have her. Sound like a few generas you know so far? Porn or Romance, depending on what happens next. But wait, there’s more. She knows not who he is, he is a powerful sociopath, and the chase begins. She is the victim and fears she is losing her mind (for the psychobabble content ingredient), he the crazy bad guy (the demonized and/or denigrated must be male), there is also a good guy (well, maybe he is), there may or may not be sex involved (thankfully not in this book) etc. This is a Romance novel, not D&D.

I’m not saying porn for women should not exist. Musicals too, I guess. Different strokes for different folks. But does it have to be everywhere, all the time? It would be nice if we could at least keep this stuff, whichever kind it is, whoever it is written for, in its own genera so the unsuspecting don’t stumble across it and have that “ewwww” moment. A little consideration or proper categorization should not be asking too much.

0 of 8 people found this review helpful