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Misjustice

How British Law Is Failing Women
Narrated by: Helena Kennedy
Length: 11 hrs and 1 min
4.7 out of 5 stars (14 ratings)

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Summary

Brought to you by Penguin.

Two women a week are killed by a spouse or partner.

Every seven minutes a woman is raped.

The police receive one phone call per minute about domestic violence.

Now is the time for change.

Helena Kennedy forensically examines the pressing new evidence that women are being discriminated against when it comes to the law. From the shocking lack of female judges to the scandal of female prisons and the double discrimination experienced by BAME women, Kennedy shows with force and fury that change for women must start at the heart of what makes society just.

Previously published as Eve Was Shamed.

©2019 Helena Kennedy (P)2019 Penguin Audio

Critic reviews

"Helena Kennedy has written a chilling exposé of how the law has historically failed women. Taking no prisoners, Kennedy outlines the damage we must undo, and the changes we must make." (Amanda Foreman)

"Fascinating and chilling." (Caroline Criado Perez, author of Invisible Women)

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Brilliant and important

Overall, this book is incredibly gripping and sets out the issues with all the clarity and power that you'd expect of the author. Finished in two days, and I take these things slowly. I would have loved to have heard some of the stories in more depth and to get a little more of how the cases mentioned played out in court. Occasionally, Helena will mention her involvement in a matter and its a little disappointing for her to then speed onto the next point without spending a bit of time elaborating on the human story of it all. The result imposes on the book a focus on the big picture - lots of figures and headline policy developments - rather than providing for all that much in terms of illustrative human story. However, I do appreciate, given the subject matter, that its a fine line to walk between engagement and 'entertainment', which would be inappropriate given the content and wouldn't do justice to the material. After all, it reads as a book that expects you to engage with the issues on a policy level without needing to pander to you. On the flip side, the result is an amazing picture of each thematic study of issues that are both national and international. I don't want the above to read as if the book is mechanical, it is not. The passion for the issues is evident and there is plenty of humanity in the writing style. Overall, thoroughly recommend.

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