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Summary

The first novel of the rise and fall of the Drakan Empire, an alternative history saga.

In Marching Through Georgia, the Draka begin their conquest of the globe as they fight and best that more obvious horror, the Nazis.

©1988 S. M. Stirling (P)2020 Recorded Books

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • GB
  • 20-07-20

Story line is good but . . .

The storyline is interesting unfortunately, the narrator performance is stilted, to the point of being boring. Overall, this book would be superb if read by someone with a range for character development and voice. All characters sound the same.

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  • Stuart N. Burruss
  • 07-07-21

Couldn’t Finish the Story

I could handle the whole “alternative history” bit, but trying to believe the plethora of advanced technology that the Drakar forces possessed was too much of a stretch. Butterfly bombs, claymore mines, automatic mortars, and shaped charges to name just a few. The author should have steered this story back into the reality what tech was actually available in the 1930-40s.