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Summary

The continuing saga of the Five Dragons, Ian McDonald's fast-paced, intricately plotted space opera pitched as Game of Thrones meets The Expanse

A hundred years in the future, a war wages between the Five Dragons - five families that control the moon's leading industrial companies. Each clan does everything in their power to claw their way to the top of the food chain - marriages of convenience, corporate espionage, kidnapping, and mass assassinations. 

Through ingenious political manipulation and sheer force of will, Lucas Corta rises from the ashes of corporate defeat and seizes control of the moon. The only person who can stop him is a brilliant lunar lawyer: his sister, Ariel. 

Witness the Dragons' final battle for absolute sovereignty in Ian McDonald's heart-stopping finale to the Luna trilogy.

©2019 Ian McDonald (P)2019 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What listeners say about Luna: Moon Rising

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sad to see this series end

Ian writes characters as real people. They are complex, flawed, frustrating, funny, and incredibly charismatic.

This is an author with real life experience of a life under comeplex politics, in broken communities and with unfathomable family dynamics.

Book one made me work to keep up. Book two was like being stuck in a dance so complicated and fast moving that I had to stop for breath.

Moon Rising rounded everything up. just a shocking and devastating, I never knew what to expect.

I have seen many reviews likening the trilogy to Game of Thrones. I see it in the scope but not the detail.

I completely and unreservedly recommend it

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Still good but a little bit hard work

Ian McDonald's Luna series has depth which few other authors can sustain. This episode continues the political intrigue and plotting of the previous works.

The performance is good but not great. Some of the voices sound too similar. The long vowels seem to be the same across all the female characters. There is no attempt at accents. But it is acceptable.

However the quality of the Portuguese was better in the first multi-person narration.

The story has many points of view, as did the previous books. But a new force, the University of Farside makes an appearance out of whole cloth. I don't recall it from the previous works. Ditto the equatorial solar mirrors which are allegedly visible from the Earth but not mentioned previously.

That said, although the changing viewpoints require work the book is a worthwhile follow on.

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  • Robert N. Stephenson
  • 30-04-19

quote good

the story is good...complex and otherworldly.
.the pronunciation of the names poeric and engaging.

i prefer the expanse but this is good in 8ts own right

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  • Linda “K”
  • 23-03-19

Fitting Ending with only a Few Loose Ends

The third (and final) book in McDonald’s Five Dragons duology (parse that how you will). _Luna: Moon Rising_ seems to be compared against Heinlein’s _The Moon is a Harsh Mistress_ but other than both being set in a future version of settling Luna, the sophistication, style, and storytelling of McDonald give his trilogy a resoundingly different feel on almost every level. Heinoein was a master of his trade but we’ve come a long distance politically, sexeually, and SF content-wise in the last six decades. A comparison is unfair to both books. All I can say is I’ll miss the characters and setttings — I was hoping for an epilogue set a few thousand years out as Man finally inched his way out of the local system. But that would have been pure fan boy servicing and would not have added to the story of the current books, These books wrapped up all key storylines and gave us, if not a happy, a totally satisfying ending.

Excellent audio work as usual (Audible item). Now we just have to fidget about to see what McDonald does next...