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Summary

'Which is the best band I've been in? The Small Faces were the most creative, The Faces were the most fun, The Who were the most exciting. These were electrifying days in music. We were all untried, untested. What was stopping us? Nothing.'  

As drummer with The Small Faces, Faces and later The Who, Kenney Jones' unique sense of rhythm was the heartbeat that powered three of the most influential rock bands of all time.   

Beginning in London's postwar East End, Kenney's story takes us through the birth of the Mod revolution, the mind-bending days of the late 1960s and the raucous excesses of the '70s and '80s. In a career spanning six decades, Kenney was at the epicentre of many of the most exciting moments in music history and has experienced everything the industry has to offer. He jointly created some of the world's most loved records, hung out with the Stones, the Beatles, David Bowie, Keith Moon and Rod Stewart, and suffered the loss of close friends to rock 'n' roll excess and success.   

The legacy created by Kenney and his bandmates has influenced acts as diverse as Led Zeppelin, the Sex Pistols and Oasis. Now, for the very first time, Kenney tells the full story of how a young Cockney Herbert played his part in the biggest social transformation in living memory - the people, the parties, the friendships, the fallouts, the laughter, the sadness, the sex, drugs, and a lot of rock 'n' roll, while also opening up about his own deeply personal battles and passions, too. This is a vivid and breathtaking immersion into the most exciting era of music history and beyond.

©2018 Kenney Jones (P)2018 Bonnier Publishing

What listeners say about Let The Good Times Roll

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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"Been There, Done That...."

It’s probably fair to say that most people outside of the music industry won’t know who Kenney Jones is. And it is equally fair to say that most of these would, at some time, have found themselves dancing to a record bearing his trademark, solid drumming.

Kenney Jones has had a remarkable musical career. He left school in the East End of London aged just 15 to take up an apprenticeship, only to find himself only two years later a bona fide popstar as drummer in the successful group, The Small Faces. The band remained successful throughout the 60s, and when lead vocalist Steve Marriot left the band in 1969, Jones and the other remaining members joined forces with a young blues singer called Rod Stewart, and the rest is history.

Even during his time with The Small Faces, Jones was finding his no-nonsense style and solid, danceable grooves in demand, and despite him not being able to read music, he became a sought-after session player, playing for Joan Armatrading, The Who, Andy Fairweather-Low and many others.

In the late 70s Rod Stewart left the Faces to concentrate on a solo career. Initially he asked Kenney to continue in the drum seat, but after much soul-searching Kenney realised that this would be a path to obscurity, as he slowly became just a part of a backing group with no say in what the band were doing. He wasn’t out of work for long; following the untimely death of The Who’s Keith Moon, the band asked Kenney to take over the role of band drummer. He jumped at the chance, but it soon became evident that this request had not been unanimously agreed, with singer Roger Daltrey being especially frosty. After a few years in the band, the end of the road came when Daltrey insisted Kenney be fired. A difficult time followed, during which contractual obligations forced the band to put on concerts and attend publicity junkets while Kenney ‘worked his notice’. This situation was made more awkward by the band being asked in 1985 to play Live Aid at Wembley Stadium, and Kenney being asked if he could drum for them, “just one more time”. Daltrey was NOT happy at Kenney’s involvement, and watching the video today on YouTube, his anger is plain to see.

Unlike many of his contemporaries Kenney has always been careful with money, and this has enabled him to make lucrative investments outside of the world of pop music, most notably his polo club at Hurtwood Park in Surrey, UK.

He also speaks openly and frankly about his cancer scares and how he managed to survive the treatments and months of recovery that followed.

Narration by David John is first-rate and keeps the listener engaged throughout.

Highly recommended

4 people found this helpful

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Wow, what a fantastic life

Thank you Kenny Jones for getting your life story ‘out there’. This is a fun and tender account starting with Kenny’s beginning with his East End family through his years with The Small Faces and The Who and beyond. I found the narrator to be excellent.

2 people found this helpful

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Kenney Jones

Loved it
Never had an audio book before.
Want to listen to more books. Thanks.

1 person found this helpful

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As a huge Small Faces fan…

…and as he’s the last surviving member, this was a huge disappointment. I guess it’s Kenny’s story, so it is what it is, and the middle part is fairly good, hearing about the other guys etc. But why on god’s earth his editor thought we’d want to hear about his planning permission struggles. ‘I took the call at my polo club’, has to be the most un-rock n roll sentence ever written. Especially given he owned it. Should be called memoir of an entitled boomer. Sorry, but it was that bad. Such a shame as the Small Faces story deserves a better telling.

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Interesting to a point

If you are fan of 60/70s rock and faces/small faces you’ll find this reasonably interesting. The best bits for me was to hear more about the small faces and why they broke up and how the faces formed. I also found Kenneys childhood interesting. On the other hand the lengthy details about the “hijinks” he got up to particularly with the small faces and faces became very tedious and irritating after a while. Whilst I understand it was entertaining for Kenney to write his memoirs, the book would have benefited from much tougher editing with more focus on the music and les focus on the rock n roll lifestyle. At times Kenney comes across as a bit of a tit. The bits about his wife seemed unnecessary and I wonder what her side of the story was. If I had paid for this book I would have been slightly disappointed

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  • AC
  • 01-06-21

Entertaining Nostalgia

Interesting listening for anyone with an interest in the history of British pop music.

Kenney's story, whilst not packed full of drunken debauchery, is well worth hearing.

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Fantastic book

Brilliant insights into what happened to those musicians who created the soundtrack of my life. Well done Kenney Jones a good guy.

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A great warts-and-all biography

Being a huge fan of both The Small Faces and The Who, I had no idea of how much else Kenney Jones got up to during his musical career or of his battles with cancer. An absorbing listen, beautifully read throughout.

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East End boy done good - Forgets East End

An easy listen with some great anecdotes and mentions of the lovely people like Ronnie Laine. Kenney manages to tell his story without piling on the rags to riches theme too much but does revert to it in the end. He manages to make what must have been a super life seem almost, usual, even the antics of his fellow musical excessives.

Some poignant moments, but on the whole, there's not a lot of detail in the behaviours of the rich and famous, must be a case of what goes on tour, stays on tour.

Read really well, can't fault that.

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So much to like

Overall an enthralling story which has given me an excellent insight into the life of a musical icon from my own era, who I previously knew very little about.
I marked it down because I thought there was too much time hopping which lead to quite a bit of rewinding.
I also felt a little let down by the shallowness of some of the stories.
However if you love the music of the 60s and 70s this is well worth the listen.