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Summary

One of the most extraordinary, imaginative and ambitious novels of the century: a history of the evolution of humankind over the next 2 billion years. Among all science fiction writers Olaf Stapledon stands alone for the sheer scope and ambition of his work. First published in 1930, Last and First Men is full of pioneering speculations about evolution, terraforming, genetic engineering and many other subjects.

©1930 Olaf Stapledon (P)2012 Audible Ltd

What members say

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

One of the more unusual books I have read.

Breathtaking in span a book without characters. It is dated but worth it. A unique view on mankind.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Jose
  • Internet
  • 14-07-17

impressive but not interesting

Impressive scope and foresight for a book that was written in 1930,
but ultimately not interesting enough for my taste.
No story or characters, just a bunch of concepts and small events explaining the long story of humanity across 18 civilisations ...

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  • Isaac Sharp
  • 16-03-14

Starts slow, but give it time; mind-blowing

What did you like best about this story?

The vast scope of time.

Any additional comments?

In the forward, [whoever wrote that] said they recommend skipping the first 3 chapters because they are tedious, and obviously, are now past future-history, which makes the predictions a little laughable in their falseness.
I didn't skip the first 3 chapters and almost gave the book up at around the 2 hour mark, and am so happy I didn't. It grows exponentially more amazing and interesting all the way to the end. Unlike anything I've read before. Truly mind-expanding.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Michael G Kurilla
  • 28-07-13

Quite impressive for 1930

Stapledon attempts to convey the evolution of humans over a 2 billion year epoch. The breadth and scope of concepts are extensive and even somewhat surprising given the extent of scientific thinking at that time. Interestingly, he also nails some geopolitical evolution in his near term in that the US and China end up vying for global supremacy as well as identifying Germany dominating Europe economically (interestingly due to their pacifist nature following their WWI defeat). What follows is a natural progression of stages with current day being the "first" men and ending with the last, or eighteenth iteration of "humans". The story is conveyed as a message from the last to first when the last anticipate their eventual destruction.

The sci-fi elements are varied and Stapledon covers the gamut (only missing computers). He brings in biological warfare and anticipates genetic manipulation, first on microorganisms and finally animals, plants and even humans (some of which serve to demarcate the 1 - 18 progression). He envisions nuclear fission (annihilation of matter which leads to disaster), loss of fossil fuels, geothermal and wind power, space exploration (etherships instead of spaceships), Martian and Venusian lifeforms, alien invasion of Earth, planet wide terraforming, contact with the past and much more.

One particular note - this is not a story with characters and a plot. The tale unfolds more along the lines of a history professor's class lectures with emphasis on the dominate themes driving each version of man along with the forces shaping their evolution and transitions. The narration is excellent and makes up for what would otherwise be a pedantic soliloquy.

9 of 10 people found this review helpful

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  • Matt
  • 25-01-15

Breathtaking scope and vision.

Truly one of the greatest books ever written. There's nothing else like Stapeldon. Make sure to read Starmaker after.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • S. Wells
  • 10-12-12

Future History: "Life, the Universe, & Everything"

A classic, written over 80 years ago, before the results of World War II were known, and before any of the current technology was conceived (the first binary digital computer and the Turing machine were both not developed until 1936). This is definitely a history, not a story, and there are no characters here. It spans billions of years of human evolution, includes genetic engineering (used to both improve the human species and to save it from extinction, which almost occurs a number of times).

The scope of this book is ambitious, and some of Stapledon's future predictions (of the near future) are, neccessarily, inaccurate. But the philosophical impact is, nevertheless, gratifyingly huge. I first read this book in 1970, and it left an impression on me for the rest of my life. I was pleased to find it in audio, and the reader is a good match. I will listen again, and will probably get the other book of his that I have read, "Starmaker".

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

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  • Cyndi Lou from Kalamazoo
  • 09-01-17

I could not finish it.

I suffered through the first few chapters, knowing the predictions in those chapters were very. inaccurate.

However, the rest of the book was very difficult to take. It's my opinion that the same tale of the general rise and fall of humanity is told over and over. The only changes being the length of time the cycle takes to occur (ranging from centuries to millions of years) , the nature of the disaster that results in the downfall, and the sexual prowess/intelligence of the "second men" or third men. And on and on. The book, while very well narrated, was exceedingly repetitious.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    1 out of 5 stars
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  • Al
  • 26-10-16

Dry and unemotional

Struggled with this one. While it may be intellectual, lacked any emotion or connection. Had a hard time have of the book trying to understand what his point or imagery was.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Gnorb
  • 07-08-18

Fantastic. Ahead of its time.

Listening to this book, one would expect the story was written relatively recently, maybe the last 30 years. But instead, it was written almost 90 years ago.

The story tracks human evolution through billions of years, touching in the different societies that rise and fall. It’s told entirely in narrative, so don’t expect much in the way of characters, but if you like stories which flesh out a world, this one’s for you.

It is now probably the audiobook I’ve listened to most, and one I expect to enjoy over and over for years to come.

And of course, the performance itself was incredible in that it was effectively invisible. The narrator tells the story so well that you forget him. You forget the story is being told and simply sink into it. Worth your credit and worth your dollar.

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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • earmark
  • 04-05-18

Extremely deeply thought out.

21 Hegelean evolutions of humankind to include a hive-mind in our last iteration and they evolve and migrate through our solar system, to finally be undone by the sun exploding- not bad for 1930.

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Glenn
  • 26-03-18

Mind Expanding

This book should be required reading for every student. It helps in obtaining the long view of the future.

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Justin Lynch
  • 24-01-17

Worth it

Difficult/slow to start but the 2nd half is brilliant and thought provoking enough to justify an avg. of 5 stars