Listen free for 30 days

Know Your Place

Essays on the Working Class by the Working Class
Length: 6 hrs and 46 mins
5 out of 5 stars (17 ratings)

£7.99/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime

Summary

In 21st century Britain, what does it mean to be working class? This book asks 24 working class writers to examine the issue as it relates to them. 

Examining representation, literature, sexuality, gender, art, employment, poverty, childhood, culture and politics, this book is a broad and firsthand account of what it means to be drawn from the bottom of Britain's archaic but persistent class structure.

©2017 Nathan Connolly (P)2018 Audible, Ltd

What listeners say about Know Your Place

Average customer ratings
Overall
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    14
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    10
  • 4 Stars
    4
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    10
  • 4 Stars
    4
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A wonderful polyphonic book, highly recommended.

This fantastic collection offers real insight into lives that often pass unseen and unheard, because it suits our society to imagine that those we don't hear are somehow lesser or ignorant rather than systematically suppressed. There is so much joy, anger, passion and talent in these pieces I am keen to search out the other books by these authors.I learned an enormous amount from these essays, although this was absorbed under the radar as the enjoyment of the narrative was always the prime factor. In this instance the choice of readers enhances the essays, unlike many other audible books. I really can't recommend this enough. If you read to open a door on other people's experience then this book kicks that wide open for you.
More of this please publishers and audible!

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • LC
  • 09-12-19

Interesting snapshots into what working class means to the authors

I found it interesting to hear what these authors had chosen to write about as a representation of working class. There were some strong themes. I wonder how representative the essays are of common opinions of what working class means to people that identity themselves as working class, and how much influence the selection process had.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Actual voice of the working class

Unlike what you hear about on the news, this is the plurality of working class voices and dispels myths of the scrounger narrative and the idea of bigotry coming from below, not above.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Important, interesting a must for everyone

Absolutely excellent book. As a working class female who has had the benefit of social mobility, I often find that those around me do not understand the hurdles that working class people have to overcome to be lucky enough to have the benefit of social mobility.

I am proud of my background but at many times I’ve been made to feel ashamed. This book spoke to me on many levels and highlights things I’ve experienced with many ‘yes! I’m not the only one who feels like that’ moments.

Class is often a blanket term and those from the working classes are often brushed over. These important, interesting stories should be heard by everyone.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Brilliant

Know Your Place is a great anthology from Dead Ink Books looking at what it means to be working class in 21st century Britain. Each essay comes at the topic from a different angle and I really loved the variety of voices. I particularly loved the essays by Andrew McMillan, Rebecca Winson, Kit de Waal, Kath McKay and Sian Norris. It worked brilliantly as an audio edition with several different readers.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Entertaining and thought-provoking

Some of the stories were serious while others were hilarious. A very well produced recording.