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Summary

Brought to you by Penguin. 

With a foreword by Tim Butcher and an introduction by Paul Theroux. 

Leaving Europe for the first time in his life, Graham Greene set out in 1935 to discover Liberia, then a virtually uncharted republic on the shores of West Africa. This captivating account of his arduous 350-mile journey on foot - a great adventure which took him from the border with Sierra Leone to the Atlantic coast at Grand Bassa - is as much a record of one young man's self-discovery as it is a striking insight into one of the few areas of Africa untouched by Western colonisation. Journey Without Maps is regarded as a masterclass in travel writing. 

©1936 Graham Greene (P)2020 Penguin Audio

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  • Brendan M Kavanagh
  • 18-12-20

Read with lackluster verve of the recently dead

Seemingly bored senseless by the task of being the narrator, which begs the question, "Why bother"