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Summary

Have you ever had a client who talks about video games, dungeons and dragons, anime, or comic books? Likely they identify as a geek. 

Being a geek can be seen as difficult for many; the social awkwardness, ineptitude, and judgment from others leads individuals to feel isolated in a world of their own. Geeks, by traditional definition, are passionate about anthologies and characters from a variety of fictional, fantasy, and virtual formats that are sometimes niche or unpopular, creating feelings of relatedness towards avatar experiences in an often otherwise lonely life.

Integrating Geek Culture into Therapeutic Practice: The Clinician's Guide to Geek Therapy is a comprehensive compendium of how Geek Therapy clinicians and scholars currently use a variety of games, media artifacts, and other geek culture items in therapeutic context and intervention. Even more important, the authors within this book are currently at the forefront of their research fields and are accordingly considered experts within the growing field of Geek Therapy clinical practice. Throughout the book, leading researchers within the field of Psychology, Communication Studies, and more have been able to provide clinical examples, research-based approaches, and specifics about how to utilize these items therapeutically - further enhancing the material and providing solid supportive guidance for clinicians. Clinicians reading this can develop further competence and understanding of the concepts found within their practices which will be helpful for their personal success and cultural competence to best serve their clientele.

These modalities have resulted in clients experiencing:

  • Reduced anxiety and depressive symptoms
  • Improved self-esteem
  • Richer interpersonal interactions
  • Greater social and school engagement and
  • Superior development of social skills and problem-solving

These techniques are being used to improve overall psychological well-being across all ages.

©2020 Leyline Publishing (P)2020 Leyline Publishing

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  • Noel M
  • 20-07-21

Great introduction on the topic

This books serves as a solid intro for anyone wishing to dip their toes into the waters of geek therapy or mental health. There is great insight into many different aspect of geek culture and I would highly recommend this book. One area of concern is how the book on some topics uses critical feminist theory to represent only one side of very deep cultural and social issues and only represents one side of the topic marginalizing and dehumanizing the "other" group. This is sad to see from clinicians as the created marginalized class has many issues and concerns that could greatly be helped and influenced by geek therapy. By doing this in effect they shun and "other" this group cutting them off from recourses that could allow them to grow and mature as a group. The lack of compassion and understanding coming from clinicians is a rather odd dynamic for a book of this sort. This is not a global issue in the book and is only reflected in a few chapters, however, is still present. I think it would have been beneficial to clinicians reading this if more view points were represented as this would be inclusive and represent the true diversity of the needs that geek clients and therapists may have, as well as, highlight growth areas in certain parts of the community without marginalizing them.