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Summary

Most of us know someone who, for whatever reason, always seems to cause problems, irritate others, or incite conflict. Often, these people are a part of our daily lives. The truth is that these trouble makers haven't necessarily asked to be this way.

Sometimes we need to learn new approaches to deal with people who are harder to get along with or love.

How to Hug a Porcupine: Easy Ways to Love Difficult People in Your Life, explains that making peace with others isn't as tough or terrible as we think it is - especially when you can use an adorable animal analogy and apply it to real-life problems.

How to Hug a Porcupine provides tips for calming the quills of parents, children, siblings, strangers, and other prickly people you may encounter. Among other tips, How to Hug a Porcupine includes:

  • Three easy ways to end an argument
  • How to spot the porcupine in others
  • How to spot the porcupine in ourselves

With a foreword by noted psychotherapist Dr. Debbie Ellis, widow of Dr. Albert Ellis, How to Hug a Porcupine is a truly special book.

©2017 June Eding (P)2017 Hatherleigh Press

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I did not enjoy this book, sorry

I can't say that I found this book useful at all. Maybe I misunderstood but I found the whole narrative quite condescending. To describe a person as a porcupine works really well as a short metaphor. However I found that it works a bit dehumanizing to keep using the term all the way through the book. I also I feel like you are being told that you have the sole responsibility of making the relation with a (for a lack of better word) Porcupine work. You should have the patience of a saint, you can not get angry back, you can not let the things they say hurt you. You have to walk on eggshells to make them understand that what they did or said was hurtful. Maybe I completely misunderstood the text ( English is not my first language) but this was the impression it gave me and it made me a bit sad.

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 10-07-20

Full of cliche

Although this book made good points, they were nothing new or eye opening. Perhaps a good starting point for a very young reader.