Listen free for 30 days

Listen with a free trial

One credit a month, good for any title to download and keep.
Unlimited listening to the Plus Catalogue - thousands of select Audible Originals, podcasts and audiobooks.
Exclusive member-only deals.
No commitment - cancel anytime.
Buy Now for £20.29

Buy Now for £20.29

Pay using card ending in
By completing your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and authorise Audible to charge your designated card or any other card on file. Please see our Privacy Notice, Cookies Notice and Interest-based Ads Notice.

Summary

Published posthumously, this dystopian novel was written between Frank Herbert's classics The Dragon in the Sea and Dune.

EMASI! Each Man a Separate Individual! That is the rallying cry of the Seps, the resistance force engaged in a class war against the upper tiers of a society driven entirely by opinion polls. Those who score high, the High-Opps, are given plush apartments, comfortable jobs, every possible convenience. But those who happen to be low-opped live crowded in warrens, facing harsh lives and brutal conditions.

Daniel Movius, ex-senior liaitor, rides high in the opinion polls - until he loses everything, brushed aside by a very powerful man. Low-opped and abandoned, Movius finds himself fighting for survival in the city's underworld. There, the opinion of the masses is clear: It is time for a revolution against the corrupt superprivileged - and every revolution needs a leader.

©2012 Herbert Properties, LLC (P)2015 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

More from the same

What listeners say about High-Opp

Average customer ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    6
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    5
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    5
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

No Reviews are Available
Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Robean
  • Robean
  • 07-12-20

Deep State? Inevitable.

Somewhat dated, in that paper documents and fax machines are key technology, but this was written shortly after 1955. Good story, good performance. It's not "Dune", but still a good ride with some interesting exploration of philosophical concepts about the cyclical nature of society/civilization.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Don Welch
  • Don Welch
  • 21-01-21

A glimpse of America in the near future.

This is a good and quick story that is more relevant today than the era it was written in. It offers a glimpse of the looming Social Credit initiatives that will eventually make its way to America. It exemplifies the lording power of the political/educated class and disdain for the working class. As usual, Herbert peppers his good story-telling with poignant political quotes and observations.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Michael G Kurilla
  • Michael G Kurilla
  • 05-09-21

Rage against the machine

Frank Herbert's High-Opp although published posthumously in 2012, was written sometime in the decade between 1955 and 1965. In this futuristic dystopian world, the evolution of computerized polling methodologies has led to opinion polls (the 'Opp' part) to replace elections. This has created a caste system where 'high-opp' individuals (connected with high-opp activities) live as elites, while the low-opps struggle to survive. The main character, Dan has been low-opp'd after a rising star career. This leads him not only to the Sep (short for separatists) movement / resistance as well as other high-opp individuals each fighting to retain their positions and control. He also learns that the polling system has become compromised and that he was specifically low-opp'd so the 'coordinator' could move in on his girl. As a result, he takes over the ragtag band of separatists and reorganizes them to an effective insurgency.

Herbert was prescient for that era (early 60's) in recognizing the evolving sophisticated polling methodology to drive societal preferences by asking questions in specific ways. He also forecasted the growing degree of inequality as a driver for social resentment. Lastly, the developed check and balances in the dispersed governmental structures serve to not only create conflicts among the various bureaus, but also allows for gaming the system to take advantage of the lack of information flow.

The narration is well done with excellent character distinction. Pacing is smooth making for a quick listen.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for GrgF
  • GrgF
  • 16-04-21

Feels Incomplete

Performance of Scott Brick was excellent but the story feels like it is missing some intricacies or details that make it seem to jump from one conclusion to the next without a binding link.

1 person found this helpful