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Summary

Existential Psychology is characterized by a stark explanation of psychopathology and a nearly hands-off approach to therapy. Because the theoretical framework is based in a habit of mind rather than a particular treatment form, the existential approach can integrate fairly well with most forms of psychotherapy. It allows for sensitivity to culture and religious beliefs that other schools of thought do not address, but it can be harsh. As of 2006, no work has been published to statistically validate existential psychotherapy and so the ideas presented by the theorists that created this field continue to remain just that: ideas that, while valuable, remain unproven.

©2014 Hannah L. Roles (P)2014 Hannah L. Roles

What listeners say about Heidegger's Ghost

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 07-02-21

This is a rip off

I feel a little robbed after buying this. It is only 18minutes long but priced at a full-length book. I am not sure how audible expects its value proposition and credibility to be upheld by allowing these books on its site

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  • MPF
  • 12-05-19

Limited

This monograph would have probably gotten a five star review from me were it not for one thing. The author wrote lucidly about the existential therapy of Bingswanger and Boss via Heidegger (though the presentation of Heidegger's philosophy was cursory). She presented this strand of existential therapy as The Existential therapy. There was a passing mention of May and Bugental, however not mention of Frankl, Yalom, Deurzen, Spinelli, or Schneider. These existential therapists have diverse philosophies and practices of therapy. Certainly this author could not have given them all a fair treatment in a brief paper such as this. However, a mention of the diversity of existential therapy would have rectified the broad-brush approach she takes here.