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Gobekli Tepe

Genesis of the Gods: The Temple of the Watchers and the Discovery of Eden
Narrated by: Shaun Grindell
Length: 12 hrs and 33 mins
4 out of 5 stars (27 ratings)

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Summary

Built at the end of the last ice age, the mysterious stone temple complex of Göbekli Tepe in Turkey is one of the greatest challenges to 21st century archaeology. As much as 7,000 years older than the Great Pyramid and Stonehenge, its strange buildings and rings of T-shaped monoliths - built with stones weighing from 10 to 15 tons - show a level of sophistication and artistic achievement unmatched until the rise of the great civilizations of the ancient world, Sumer, Egypt, and Babylon.

Chronicling his travels to Göbekli Tepe and surrounding sites, Andrew Collins details the layout, architecture, and exquisite relief carvings of ice age animals and human forms found at this 12,000-year-old megalithic complex, now recognized as the oldest stone architecture in the world. He explores how it was built as a reaction to a global cataclysm - the Great Flood in the Bible - and explains how it served as a gateway and map to the sky-world, the place of first creation, reached via a bright star in the constellation of Cygnus. He reveals those behind its construction as the Watchers of the Book of Enoch and the Anunnaki gods of Sumerian tradition.

Unveiling Göbekli Tepe's foundational role in the rise of civilization, Collins shows how it is connected to humanity's creation in the Garden of Eden and the secrets Adam passed to his son Seth, the founder of an angelic race called the Sethites. In his search for Adam's legendary Cave of Treasures, the author discovers the Garden of Eden and the remains of the Tree of Life - in the same sacred region where Göbekli Tepe is being uncovered today.

©2014 Andrew Collins (P)2018 Tantor

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What's with the resting place of the Ark?

Why does the author keep discussing the mythology of Adam and Eve without once saying “this of course is just a myth, there were lots of other humans around at the time, in fact several million over all the major continents”?
Why is the author so obsessed with finding the site of the garden of Eden?
If it is a mythical place then it was never real. If it was real then what was it? The author keeps suggesting that it is a place where there were no food chains, where lions lay down with lambs etc. Really? It is 2019 surely there are no educated people who actually believe that obligate carnivores would live peacefully with their prey? What do the lions eat? The bible is clear that Adam lived to 700 years, surely people don’t actually believe this stuff as literally true? Why are people, in 2019, talking about magic? Magic trees which secrete an oil which stops or reverses aging?
I just cannot understand what the author is saying, why does he keep using the term miraculous?
I laughed when he wrote that some bloke went to Jerusalem and miraculously found a bit of the true cross apparently made of the same wood as the magic tree.
The central idea which he could have put over in an hour, not a dozen, is that there were a group of possible human/Neanderthal hybrids that had some special knowledge and somehow “controlled” an early society to build structures such as Gobekli Tepe. However, the question is why a super-knowledgeable culture would encourage Neolithic peoples to waste their life putting up endless carved stones with animal pictures as some way of preventing another comet strike. Clearly they were not that advanced if they thought carving pictures of foxes and wolves would somehow stop a comet strike. I cannot understand how they could possibly predict comet returns (other than a short period one such as Halley) without using a heliocentric model. There is not a scrap of evidence that humans considered heliocentricity until the last millennium.
I am comfortable that Noah’s flood may well be a myth memory of something such as the flooding of the Black sea basin at the end of the last age. Why does the author spoil this interesting speculation by then discussing the resting place of the Ark? The atmosphere never holds more than 5cm of rainfall worldwide. It is puerile, childish, and frankly offensive to rational people to talk about the resting place of the Ark, this would, of course, mean that sea level suddenly rose by over a km in less than a year without any clear and obvious geological trace and causing the extinction of every land and fresh water animal on the Earth. Good luck with getting Kiwis to New Zealand in 9000BCE.
Just so tiresome! Why does the author use BC and AD when everyone is now using BCE and CE?
I was expecting the author to start bible-bashing at any moment but instead he just fizzled out as if he will tell us more amazing secrets in his next book.
If he is going to write another tedious book please could he do everyone a favour and put his cards on the table in the first chapter, I still do not know whether he regards biblical myths as stories based on real scientifically-explainable events or thinks magic and miracles are actually a thing.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Fantastic listen.

Mind blowing views on humanities evolution through history and religion. Well written and worthy of your time to listen.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Great Gobekli Tepe research.

Some of the best ideas around on what Gobekli Tepe was used for and by who.

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  • Laurie S.
  • 19-08-18

Thin gruel

LOADS of speculation
Intercalated with fascinating factual tid bits

Not really worth the slog

Meh

12 of 13 people found this review helpful

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  • Sam Sapirstein
  • 28-09-18

Scam!

I should have read through the entire description. Only at the end of the long blurb does it reveal itself to be a total pile of new age bullshit. Not worth your time. This is a pity. Gobekli Tepe is a fascinating archaeological find with profound implications for the way we understand the rise of complex societies after the ice age. That the only book dedicated to it is a new age fraud frustrates me greatly.

29 of 34 people found this review helpful

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  • lmtwashington
  • 04-08-18

Nothing To Do With Gobekli Tepe

This is a ridiculous series of baseless sensational attempts at opinions packaged as fact about....not Gobekli Tepe.... but Eden and it's now uncovered location in Eastern Turkey. Right. I enjoy Collins and tha Ancient Aliens campy versions of history. It's fun sometimes especially when the stories are almost believable. This read is neither fun nor remotely believable. It's a worse than usual slam Christ, Christianity and one God. The true cross came from Eden...Golgotha conceals the skull of Adam...there remains today a lost to time but functioning and attended monastery that has been there since and was part of Eden.

Narration? Hyper intonation and inflection.

Have nothing to do with this non Gobekli Tepe ruse.

12 of 14 people found this review helpful

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  • Knowledge
  • 18-03-19

I couldn't even get to chapter 3

I really like hearing the author speak on gaia's ancient civilizations, open minds ect. I'm sure I'll love his book but this is the second book I returned and they both have the same narrator. I gave it a shot not knowing it was his voice. I was driving and before I knew it I had a terrible headache. I have never had such a reaction to a person's voice and he doesn't even speak clearly!

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Nicole Miller
  • 23-02-18

Guaranteed to fill your head... completely!

What a huge amount of information given in this tome. Hang in there for the conclusion. It comes together brilliantly in the second half. I feel better grounded in history on many levels after listening.

10 of 14 people found this review helpful

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  • Anjanette M. Ruscetta
  • 07-05-18

very difficult book to follow

Very informative and factual, how ever I felt it went to deep into many other things that were on the fringe of not being involved.

6 of 9 people found this review helpful

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  • Anonymous User
  • 14-06-18

Great research, well presented, fascinating!

If you are into this stuff, this book is a must hear. Well researched and fascinating material. Whether you are a hard core believer of a more ancient history or a new comer I highly reccomend this book.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • trowland
  • 21-10-18

loved every minute. I will listen a second time.<br />

Can't wait to listen to this one again. have one more book in line then this one cuts back to the front.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Wxman2
  • 17-09-18

A long look back at the dawn of the temple of man.

Really enjoyed the insights to this archeological find. I hope you will look for answers to this dig alzo.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • johnny_vindaloo
  • 01-08-18

Fantastic

Middle section (more technical) isn’t well suited to audio format but still a fascinating take on the site I haven’t heard before.

1 of 4 people found this review helpful