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Summary

If you are interested in learning the best ways possible to improve mental health then you need to listen to Exercise for the Brain: 70 Neurobic Exercises to Increase Mental Fitness Prevent Memory Loss.

This audiobook is in a fashion that is easy to understand and the author himself has used quite a number of the techniques outlined in the text to his own benefit.

As more and more people seek better ways to retain and improve their memory this audiobook is well timed. It gives the listener the solutions that they need to get started on the path to having a fantastic memory. Of course in quite a number of instances memory loss cannot be helped as it may be hereditary but it can be slowed down with the use of these exercises. Just as the body needs physical exercises in order to function correctly, the brain needs to be exercised as well to prevent it from becoming sluggish.

©2013 Yap Kee Chong (P)2013 Yap Kee Chong

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Disappointing

What disappointed you about Exercise for the Brain?

The narrator was unfortunately flat in his delivery. The book could have been delivered in less than half the time but for the constant repetition. The advice was scattered almost a word at a time through the narrative, in my opinion exercises were childish and unconvincing, for example, bathe in differing water tempuratures, spend a day, then a week communicating wordlessly.