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Enduring the Whirlwind

The German Army and the Russo-German War 1941-1943
Narrated by: James Anderson Foster
Length: 9 hrs and 11 mins
Categories: History, European
4 out of 5 stars (10 ratings)

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Summary

Despite the best efforts of a number of historians, many aspects of the ferocious struggle between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union during the Second World War remain obscure or shrouded in myth. One of the most persistent of these is the notion - largely created by many former members of its own officer corps in the immediate postwar period - that the German Army was a paragon of military professionalism and operational proficiency whose defeat on the Eastern Front was solely attributable to the amateurish meddling of a crazed former Corporal and the overwhelming numerical superiority of the Red Army.

A key pillar upon which the argument of German numerical-weakness vis-à-vis the Red Army has been constructed is the assertion that Germany was simply incapable of providing its army with the necessary quantities of men and equipment needed to replace its losses. In consequence, as their losses outstripped the availability of replacements, German field formations became progressively weaker until they were incapable of securing their objectives.

This work seeks to address the notion of German numerical-weakness in terms of Germany's ability to replace its losses and regenerate its military strength, and assess just how accurate this argument was during the crucial first half of the Russo-German War.

©2016 Gregory Liedtke (P)2017 Tantor

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chewing thick grass

if ou like numbers and stats this one's for you. for m it was like chewing thick grass. extremely boring narrative. wasted money on that one.

1 person found this helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars

whose idea was it to make this am audio book ?

This book should be read phisically with a notepad by your side and the first 5 chapters are a cross between listening to the shipping forcast and the football scores being read out .
Around chapter 5 a story starts to come out but i think most people would have stopped reading long before that .
This is a reference statisticle book that just completely bogs down in numbers .
The book gets better and better from chapter 5 onwards but that's a very strange way to write a book .

1 person found this helpful

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  • abulbulian
  • 24-03-18

beat audible since David Gland Stalingrad

amazing research had gone into this title. be prepared to rethink and relearn almost everything you thought you knew about the German struggle in the east. kudos to the producers of this selection. Hope for more of the same caliber WW2 east front titles.

5 people found this helpful

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  • Bear
  • 14-01-19

Informative Analysis

Enlightening about troop unit strengths versus the main stream history of this theater. Worth several listens from the volume of material.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Dane K Peterson
  • 21-06-18

Great thesis, tons of facts.

If you are interested in lots of numbers, this book is for you. The thesis explores the idea that Germany lost WWII, not because of the onslaught of Soviet forces, but rather key strategic and logistical reasons. However, rather than using personal accounts, it goes into a long and detailed logistics analysis citing countless unit and division strengths and weaknesses throughout the war.

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  • S.C. James
  • 30-01-18

Not a light listen

An academic analysis that is not well supported by other audiobooks I have listened to such as "The Forgotten Soldier." The argument is made that the German forces stayed well equipped with plenty of tanks and motorized units. But the story is more complex than that. One idea could be that machinery was over-counted because it took into consideration broken down and obsolete systems. A thorough accounting of the numbers of tanks, etc. was presented, but this information might only be useful to someone doing research.

3 people found this helpful

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  • William R. Todd-Mancillas (Name includes hyphen and camptalized M)
  • 07-11-17

WW2 east/west military might.

Tedious statistical delineation ot Russian. /German military might during 1940--1943. Vivid description of Stalingrad campaign. Meant for scholars, not for amateur historian ww2 meant to studyband ponder. Meant for academics to study and ponder. ........Narration is uninspiring.

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  • Michael S Healy
  • 18-02-20

excellent! Wonderfully detailed!

This work IS NOT for the Operation Barbarossa beginner! This essential book investigates a crucial but neglected aspect of the war on the Eastern Front.