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Eat It Anyway

Fight the Food Fads, Beat Anxiety and Eat in Peace
Length: 8 hrs and 42 mins
4.3 out of 5 stars (7 ratings)

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Summary

‘One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.' - Virginia Woolf.

The definition of 'healthy eating' has been chewed up, spat out and re-digested enough times to make Joe Public give up and seek out their nearest branch of McDonald's. Our mindless obsession with eating 'right' is such that we're now more concerned about what our Instagram followers think of a poorly lit picture of our dinner than we are of its effect on our own palate. Or, indeed, our happiness. We seem to be living in a time where we no longer eat with our hearts, emotions or heritage - but with what our waistlines (and followers) in mind.   

Not Plant Based are on a mission to help you love food again. The principle is very simple: eat what you like and don't worry about it. It's a menu that's especially delicious, 'guilt-free' and requires a hell of a lot less money spent in health food shops. Throughout the audiobook, Laura and Eve call on experts to debunk myths and provide a balanced exploration of our attitude towards food, with some delicious recipes thrown in along the way. They discuss their own experiences of eating disorders and offer personal tips and coping mechanisms to help rid you of anxiety linked to food. No one is saying healthy eating is bad; there is simply a lot of misleading information out there. More to the point, food is so much more in the grand scheme of life than health: it's family, friends, enjoyment and memories.       

So go on, take a bite out of the multi-cast audiobook for How To Feel the Fear and Eat It Anyway and learn to love your food all over again. It's so mouth-wateringly good - we bet you'll be back for seconds.    

©2019 Eve Simmons and Laura Dennison (P)2019 Octopus Publishing Group

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  • anonymous
  • 18-06-19

Good, but . . .

The general message is good, but there were certain sections that made me roll my eyes so far into my head I thought they’d get stuck there. The first is where they’re listing reasons to love dairy. One of the reasons cited is that if animals weren’t farmed by humans, their populations would skyrocket and we’d quickly have cow infestations. Not only is it ridiculous, it’s categorically false. Populations of those animals would decrease without farming, not increase. I’m not a vegan, but if you’re trying to convince people of the benefits of dairy, stick to the enjoyment argument and stay away from dubious claims about animal populations. The second issue came from a section of the book where they criticize studies linking red meat consumption to colorectal cancer. They criticize the studies for being epidemiological instead of randomized controlled trials. The reason why studies like this in humans can’t be randomized controlled trials is because it’s considered unethical to intentionally try to make study participants developed cancer, no funding source would ever approve a study like that. Later, they favorably cite a study that had fewer than 25 participants. Anyone with a basic knowledge of statistics understands that a sample fewer than 25 can not produce statistically significant results that are representative of a population following a normal curve. Regarding the narration, both authors have pleasant voices, but one reads at a much slower rate than the other. Every time they changed narrators I would have to adjust the speed up or down. They change narrators about every five or ten minutes so this got tedious. These flaws in the book made it difficult to fully enjoy. I like the overall message which is to relax and enjoy your food, but I could have done without the inaccuracies.