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Summary

The mysteries surrounding the deaths of nine young, experienced ski hikers in 1959 have never been solved. On a trip through the Ural Mountains, the group of students first were reported missing and then were found deceased, but several were not located until months following the tragedy. Despite exhaustive investigations, there has never been a theory that explains exactly what killed the nine, and because of this, many unusual conjectures have arisen. Strange theories include a yeti attack, UFOs, and teleportation, military/government secret weapons testing, rogue missiles, or parachute mines, radio waves, and black holes.

Because of the truly strange behavior of the nine skiers, their shocking causes of death from autopsy reports and other evidence, and the many unanswered questions, the mystery has sparked fierce debates.

The fact is that we may never know exactly what happened to the young people during their trip and especially on February 1-2 of 1959, but Dyatlov Nine: Death Below Zero offers a theory that fits all the evidence including diaries, forensics, and photographs. With new pictures and new maps in the book, the case may finally be solved.

Warning: Graphic autopsy reports and photographs.

©2019 Catt Dahman (P)2019 Catt Dahman

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Another explanation of the mountain mystery

Without doubt the Dyatlov Pass Incident is one of the greatest mysteries in the history of mountaineering. The key question is why did the group leave the tent and sentence themselves to death by leaving their boots and warm clothes behind. Every book tries to answer this question. I'm not an author I am mountaineer, I've been a mountaineer for over 30 years. I have been in hurricane strength winds at altitude, its alarming but not uncommon. You don't leave your tent because if you do the wind blows you over or into the air. It's that simple.Your best chance is to stay put and hope your tent survives. They had a tough old canvass tent, mechanically probably quite strong. This book is not the explanation of their death. Even if they had decided to escape they'd have kitted up. Anything else is suicide again it's that simple. We may never know what happened. One thing is certain they ran in panic for their lives abandoning all they had learned about surviving in the mountains. Usually such things are due to the threat of other humans...

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  • John
  • 15-10-20

Author is a B Horror Writer, My God It Shows

This is a poorly written book. The structure and narrator are atrocious. The first 3 hours are a fan fiction of the events of that night, essentially a bad film script or creepy pasta, down to cheesy “I love both of you, not just one of you” type lines from Zina as she watches her friends and according to the author, LOVERS, dying.

SKIP THOSE FIRST 3 HOURS.

She also seems to think a lack of evidence to back up her theory and flat out calling the authorities who investigated the site liars proves her correct.
I do love this case, and the authors imagined chain of events after the hikers left the tent is plausible after you remove the fictional dialogue.

HOWEVER.

Her reasoning for all 9 hikers leaving the tent in the first place was the weakest part of this book by far, it was laughable, and left me wishing I hadn’t wasted my time and money on it. She spends a lot of the book gaslighting the conditions at the site to be equivalent to those in the death zone of Everest (LOL) , and wants you to believe all 9 suffered from hypoxia so severely at 10,000 ft (the height of my house here in the Rockies) that they walked out into a blizzard in negative temperatures and died because a single member of the group heard thunder that sounded like explosions, which caused him to have war flashbacks, and this one member’s delusion on its own merit was enough to convince all other 8 people to cut themselves out of their tent in a panic and walk out into freezing conditions without anyone questioning the logic of that move.

Let me rate this theory/book in the authors style:
1 Star. Wishful thinking from someone who couldn’t decide between a factual or fictional take on these events. Whitley Strieber would be proud. There are far better books about the Dyatlov case out there.

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  • Paisley
  • 16-03-20

excellent book

wish there would be some way for audible to give us the pictures that come with a book!

3 people found this helpful