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Summary

Misogyny is a hot topic, yet it's often misunderstood. What is misogyny, exactly? Who deserves to be called a misogynist? How does misogyny contrast with sexism, and why is it prone to persist - or increase - even when sexist gender roles are waning? This book is an exploration of misogyny in public life and politics by the moral philosopher and writer Kate Manne. It argues that misogyny should not be understood primarily in terms of the hatred or hostility some men feel toward all or most women. Rather, it's primarily about controlling, policing, punishing, and exiling the "bad" women who challenge male dominance. And it's compatible with rewarding "the good ones," and singling out other women to serve as warnings to those who are out of order. It's also common for women to serve as scapegoats, be burned as witches, and treated as pariahs. 

Manne examines recent and current events such as the Isla Vista killings by Elliot Rodger, the case of the convicted serial rapist Daniel Holtzclaw, who preyed on African-American women as a police officer in Oklahoma City, Rush Limbaugh's diatribe against Sandra Fluke, and the "misogyny speech" of Julia Gillard, then Prime Minister of Australia, which went viral on YouTube. The book shows how these events, among others, set the stage for the 2016 US presidential election. Not only was the misogyny leveled against Hillary Clinton predictable in both quantity and quality, Manne argues it was predictable that many people would be prepared to forgive and forget regarding Donald Trump's history of sexual assault and harassment. For this, Manne argues, is misogyny's oft-overlooked and equally pernicious underbelly: exonerating or showing "himpathy" for the comparatively privileged men who dominate, threaten, and silence women.

©2018 Oxford University Press (P)2018 Audible, Inc.

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Fantastic 👍🏽

People tell you 'Women have equal rights'
So why does life as a girl or woman feel so unequal and unfair? ... and why do I in fact feel so guilty sometimes in saying so? This book brilliantly explains both ..
It did have me running to the dictionary a number many times, (the writer Kate has an astounding vocabulary) But I just stuck with it as the insight, facts and explanations are mind blowing. You go girl, you are a genius at making complete and utter sence of this world for Women 😀

3 people found this helpful

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The best book I read in all year

An essential reading to every girl, woman, boy and man out there. This should be taught in schools. Gives answers to so many unnerving questions about the state of the world these days. Absolutely loved it!

3 people found this helpful

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Great read and a new perspective

As a philosophy student, I've encountered a lot of different angles on feminism and argued through many issues. This was a genuinely new perspective and I found it very thought provoking on issues of misogeny. I'll be chewing over this book for a long time and may have to buy a text copy for quick references because it's so useful. The only downer was the frequent mispronunciations by the narrator who did the author some disservices by mispronouncing or misreading some key terms, sometimes making nonsense of carefully argued sentences. That's audio for you, I suppose.

I finished this recently, but as a genuine philospohical exercise, it's a dense read. I need to go through it again at least once. The notion of women as givers has face validity in that it explains why so much is expected of women and girls while their own needs for interpersonal validation and nurture are not easily met. I was reading work by bell hooks (she doesn't use upper case: her choice) on men and love at the same time. She argues that boys are forced to 'man up' by suppressing their emotionally softer sides and that they suffer in consequence. It's an interesting contrast in some ways, but at the core for me is that no one half of the human race should be oppressed or damaged fot the good of others. I could go on, but the ideas need to mull a bit!

2 people found this helpful

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Academic text

I liked the book. There's much to think about here, and some uncomfortable truths to face.
Many more should read it. However, I think the way it's written is a bit excluding. This is written as an academic text, with vocabulary and semantics, and build up to fit. I don't think I've ever heard the word "hence" used so often. And Latin frases like "qui bono" and "post hoc" is widely used which can be daunting for many. It expects the reader to have much knowledge of the theme, and other works about it. So just be aware that this can be a heavy read if you're not used to academic texts.
At times it felt like too much time was spent on caveats. It got a bit tiresome to hear that she doesn't mean to exclude LGBTQ, black, disabled etc. I mean, it's good that caveats are made, but page upon page upon page makes it feel... inefficient.

At some points, she seems to take men's words at the worst meaning, but find apologies for women's. Not often, as most of it is justified and clearly right (there is no excuse for "grab 'em by the pussy"), but when compared to how she talks about M, who has some clearly racist views, it makes me wrinkle my brow a bit.

Anyway, as I said, I did like it. And I do recommend it. Other reviews has talked about all that's good about it, so I just wanted to talk about some things which can be problematic.

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  • CP
  • 06-11-21

academic but powerful

not a light read but a thorough examination of a complex topic that I found extremely illuminating.

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Made it half way through and gave up

Far too wordy, if I had to drink a shot for every time the word "ameliorative" was used I would be dead on the floor in an hour. If you had high hopes from the title like I did, then I would suggest reading anything by Laura Bates who is incredible.

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I need to read this again

This book is incredible in its insight. However, it was very academic and philosophical. I need to reread at some point

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Essential reading

This is a enlightening book and it's content if it were known and understood by a greater number of people would do much to make the world a better place for everyone, especially women. It's not got 5 stars because the language can be quite academic and hard to understand and therefor not as suitable for audio.

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  • vincent martin
  • 22-10-18

A brilliant philosophical overview of Misogyny,

this book is a brilliant overview and analysis of mysogyny and all the myriad manifestations of it in US society. Most poignantly, the author address the relationship between mysogynism and racism. Also very apparent is how a level of narcessism is required for it to be prevalent. As a person that has been actively researching sexism and racism the past few years, this is a book that is a must read and one that I highly recommend.

7 people found this helpful

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  • Mack Eulet
  • 25-09-18

crucial

so sharp, so important. a crucial book. deeply clarifying. not a happy book...but often witty.

7 people found this helpful

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  • j fid
  • 08-02-19

Five Star Book w/bad Narration

This book is important enough that it should be re-read by someone else. I’m staying with it because I have the book and based on the density of the topic and my learning style I realized i needed to have it read to me. I use the book to follow along.

Bad narration. I’m a power user on Audible. This is bad.

Proud to say though that my daughter was the one who gave me this book—it’s being used as a textbook at her college for a Women and Gender Studies class. She read it in 2017 and gave it to me.

This book and Manne are finally getting recognition, and I highly recommend this book as vital, necessary reading for everyone. Everyone.

It deserves a re-reading in the Audible format however.

12 people found this helpful

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  • FroggyM
  • 27-02-19

Narrator reads way too fast

Unfortunately I had to give up and return this audiobook. The narrator reads way too quickly for me to process the content. And the audible app only offers speed variants in 25% increments, which is too big a jump. Listening at 75% speed is ok, but a little too slow, and the voice sounds robotic and distracting when slowed down. Audible needs to offer 10 or 15% increments. And nonfiction books shouldn't be speed-read by narrators.

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  • CBW
  • 10-02-19

Timely and Thoughtful

Well thought out and argued. Incredibly important must read for feminists of any generation. Highly recommend also for any woman contemplating a run for political office.

4 people found this helpful

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  • S. Tyler Hendrix
  • 11-12-18

I've been wondering

This is a very thorough and well thought-out case for fighting the patriarchy. I've been wondering what the underlying causes for some of the recent hatred is and this book does a good job of breaking it down. Now we just need a solid plan for solving the problem.

3 people found this helpful

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  • Amy Schumacher
  • 08-10-18

A much needed book.

This is a wonderful analysis of what Misogyny is and why the dictionary definition is not only inadequate but the antithesis of helpful. Kate Manne does a good job of citing scientific studies in addition to giving historical, literary or contemporary examples to support her positions. This is an important read for all in this age. Part of the solution is learning why we have this problem in the first place.

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  • Kate
  • 05-03-20

Kate Manne Nails It

I'll be honest, this is a very frustrating book to listen to if only because Kate Manne is so accurate, precise and detailed in the misogyny that women face on a daily basis. There are a lot of very hard truths to swallow and accept. She couldn't be more accurate in my opinion and I am glad to have read the book, even if the conclusions were ultimately sad to hear.

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  • Me Customer
  • 24-11-21

Meaningful analysis ruined by Neoliberal Bias

I really enjoyed the differentiation between Misogyny and Sexism, as well as the new, more sociological definition of Misogyny. Sadly, the author's Neo-Liberal political bias makes the rest of the book like watching a pundit from Hillary Clinton's campaign pontificating on MSNBC. Most of the people from the Progressive Left voted for Jill Stein, unlike what the author implied, that everyone voted for Trump and that was why Clinton lost. Hillary Clinton lost because she was a horrible career politician. But of course the author would call such a view Misogyny at work, and that would be the end of discussion. People from the Progressive Left would gladly vote for Elisabeth Warren, and they voted Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez into the House. It was also funny that the author used so many fictional characters from a fictional world to explain Misogyny. Surely there are more realistic examples in the real world. Lastly, I remember reading The Giving Tree as a kid, and never once did I associate the tree with a female person. I didn't have a socialized gender association back then, and if anything, I thought of my father when I was reading Mr. Silverstein's book. It seems that the author's so deeply rooted in a gender-binary world that she immediately assigned a gender to the Giving Tree. Overall I like the first 1/3 of the book, but the examples she uses in the book fail to illustrate her points for me. I also treat her book less seriously for claiming repeatedly Clinton lost MAINLY because of Misogyny. No doubt she has encountered sexism and misogyny throughout her entire career. But that's not the MAIN reason she lost.

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  • cinji
  • 24-07-21

Excellent take on how misogyny works on a deep level

The author impressively shows how misogyny is still very rampant even though women have achieved much in equality, resources, and external things. She shows how it’s a matter of the expectation of us women being givers, and when we refuse, bringing shame and disgust from others. In all too common cases, this means she may get abused, raped, and/or murdered.

If, in the external world, she tries for something previously reserved for men, such as high political office, commentators start in on how “greedy” she is and how shrill her voice is. Lest you think that only happened to Hillary Clinton, the author is originally from Australia, and the EXACT same thing happened there to their prime minister race. Many Americans, both on the news and in my personal sphere, commented on how annoying Hillary’s voice was and how grasping she was. When I would ask as opposed to Trump’s harsh, grating tones, and clear long record of corruption and greed, they had no logical answer and voted for him.

Women who refuse to do the expected giving, such as women who choose not to become wives and/or mothers, or who do not defer to men, comfort them, or keep them from feeling negative emotions, are severely censured in society, even modern Western ones.

This is a very important book and I wish was required reading.