Listen free for 30 days

  • Double Agent

  • My Secret Life Undercover in the IRA
  • By: Kevin Fulton
  • Narrated by: Stephen Armstrong
  • Length: 8 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History, Europe
  • 4.7 out of 5 stars (609 ratings)

£7.99/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime

Summary

'I am a British soldier,' I told my reflection. 'I am a British soldier and I'm saving lives. I'm saving lives. I'm a British soldier and I'm saving lives....'

Kevin Fulton was one of the British Army's most successful intelligence agents. Having been recruited to infiltrate the Provisional IRA at the height of the Troubles, he rose its ranks to an unprecedented level. Living and working undercover, he had no option other than to take part in heinous criminal activities, including the production of bombs which he knew would later kill. So highly was he valued by IRA leaders that he was promoted to serve in its infamous internal police - ironically, his job was now to root out and kill informers.

Until one day in 1994, when it all went wrong....

Fleeing Northern Ireland, Kevin was abandoned by the security services he had served so courageously and left to live as a fugitive. The life of a double agent requires constant vigilance, for danger is always just a heartbeat away. For a double agent within the highest ranks of the IRA, that danger was doubled. In this remarkable account, Kevin Fulton - former intelligence agent, ex-member of the IRA - tells a truth that is as uncomfortable as it is gripping.

©2019 Kevin Fulton (P)2019 Bonnier Books UK

What listeners say about Double Agent

Average customer ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    447
  • 4 Stars
    136
  • 3 Stars
    20
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    4
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    387
  • 4 Stars
    110
  • 3 Stars
    27
  • 2 Stars
    9
  • 1 Stars
    4
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    421
  • 4 Stars
    89
  • 3 Stars
    21
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    3

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Gripping

A very interesting look inside the workings of the IRA. Kevin Fulton seemed to enjoy the violence whilst using the excuse that he was saving lives. I as the reader felt like it didn't really matter which side he was batting for, as long as he got to play with bullets and bombs.

6 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A really great listen! Gripping

A gripping story. Gives great insight into the troubles. A most enjoyable listen. The accent is a terrribly poor take-off of a Northern Irish accent, really bad, you'd wonder why they wouldn't just have hired a Northern Irish Narrator?

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

bad fake accent but content excellent

would have given 5 stars, but the fake northern ireland accent was very hard to listen to, especially being from Ireland and close to the border. could hear the UK accent coming through a lot. great insight into the troubles though!

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

the narrators fake northern accent is annoying

decent book but the narration is very hard to get past...awful fake northern irish accent

9 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

An amazing book

Makes me ashamed to be British reading how they treated this guy. Leaves me feeling I want to know more.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Mr
  • 30-09-19

Gripping and Outstanding!

Rare l write a review, this is a fantastic insight into a war That was dictated as much by terrorist as it was staged by security forces. Another poor individual that was manipulated by his intelligence handlers! An epic account of an informer

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Worth it

Well written & narrated. Exciting but also disturbing to know that this is the way the government and its security forces operate

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Cripping and yet depressing

Wonderful.. Unlike other reviewers I think the narrator did a good job. The story is both sad and entertaining.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Narrator’s accent is annoying, but ....

once you get used to that. What a fascinating listen. The writer did an amazing job of describing the moral dilemmas Mr Fulton faced. Edge of the seat stuff, I hope the guy gets the recognition he deserves for his bravery and service.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Excellent and very interesting book

Sad state of affairs how the state often let's down servants. even if you allow for poetic and bias license there are numerous tales of the military being let down when their careers or usefulness is over. whether that be those in the open or those undercover. the book gives some real insight in to how brutal the Troubles were and hiw dangerous for many. Definitely worth a listen along with Fishers of Men

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for J.Brock
  • J.Brock
  • 20-08-20

After a Second Try...

I reviewed this book harshly the first time I tried to listen. Once again, this is just further proof that sometimes you need to stop a book and delisted later. It can be a mood, whatever that makes all the difference. And I found this book to be a most compelling read after taking another look. Kevin Fulton's story is very complicated and sad. How he was abandoned by his British handlers, while infiltrating the IRA, is shocking. The Omagh bombing in 1998 could have been prevented had authorities acted on his tip. He literally was abandoned by those he trusted. He committed some atrocious crimes as a part of the IRA, but it is plain he felt deep remorse for what he did. He did it with the purpose of informing for British intelligence. But this came with a steep cost.

Stephen Armstrong's narration is incredible. What a story. The IRA's violence and cruelty know no bounds, and he captures Fulton's anguish perfectly.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Buretto
  • Buretto
  • 26-10-19

Dupe or sociopath?

Listening to this audiobook, one is meant to believe that the author is an incredibly gullible dupe, motivated not by ideology or religious zealotry, but by a tenuous rationalization of the patriotic duty of a soldier. Which conveniently allows him to skirt any responsibility for his atrocities (notwithstanding the legal constraints outlined restricting what he can say).

It's apt that the first line of the book is "All I ever wanted was to be a British soldier". It has the faint echo of Henry Hill in the film "Goodfellas" who says "As far back as I can remember, I always wanted to be a gangster." Like Hill, this author, is short on credibility, and has trouble recognizing his own culpability in his crimes, preferring to blame his handlers in British intelligence for the crimes he "allegedly" committed for the IRA. While there's little doubt of the truth of the despicably immoral activity of intelligence agencies worldwide, it leaves the author in the position of seeming to be either incredibly stupid, or a sociopath. My impression is the latter. There is half-hearted relief expressed at near-misses (of course, the hits are coyly referenced through legalese), but little in the way of recognition of his own behavior. He even rationalizes his activity in body counts, pro and con, people he's killed versus people he's saved (though I don't know if NOT killing someone is the same as saving them). All his energy seems focused on placing blame on others for putting him in that position.

That being said, it is an engrossing listen. It's not particularly well written, but it delivers what it promises, the secret life of an undercover agent, though lacking a bit in self-awareness and accountability.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Bandit Country
  • Bandit Country
  • 10-04-21

Newry - Dundalk

Book was a great read,
Grew up in the troubles took it all for granted.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for 6catz
  • 6catz
  • 03-05-21

Wow

You may think Fulton’s claims are entirely self-serving. You may think he was misguided or a traitor and has questionable personal mantras he’s created in order to live with himself. You may think he’s an unsung hero of an insane conflict where both sides lost sight of of any moral clarity. I found myself researching his claims in Irish newspapers, on Google and YouTube and found a lot to support the veracity of the facts as he related them. One thing’s for sure: this is one hell of a tale, and whatever you think of this man and his motives, he got spectacularly screwed by the British spooks of the time. His story and other identical stories are still under investigation. What a read.