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Disruptive Witness

Speaking Truth in a Distracted Age
Narrated by: Sean Patrick Hopkins
Length: 5 hrs and 46 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (4 ratings)

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Summary

We live in a distracted, secular age. These two trends define life in Western society today. We are increasingly addicted to habits - and devices - that distract and "buffer" us from substantive reflection and deep engagement with the world. And we live in what Canadian philosopher Charles Taylor calls "a secular age" - an age in which all beliefs are equally viable and real transcendence is less and less plausible.

Drawing on Taylor's work, Alan Noble describes how these realities shape our thinking and affect our daily lives. Too often Christians have acquiesced to these trends, and the result has been a church that struggles to disrupt the ingrained patterns of people's lives. But the gospel of Jesus is inherently disruptive: Like a plow, it breaks up the hardened surface to expose the fertile earth below.

In this book, Noble lays out individual, ecclesial, and cultural practices that disrupt our society's deep-rooted assumptions and points beyond them to the transcendent grace and beauty of Jesus. Disruptive Witness casts a new vision for the evangelical imagination, calling us away from abstraction and cliché to a more faithful embodiment of the gospel for our day.

©2018 eChristian (P)2018 eChristian

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Profile Image for MarshallP1991
  • MarshallP1991
  • 28-07-18

Thought Provoking and edifying.

Noble tackles two problems in this book, the distracted nature of our modern world, and the secular perspective of our age. But instead of catering to these issues by being one more "relevant," or using the same marketing techniques, Noble shows us how the tools we need to be a witness in such a world are already in the Church's tool belt. What is needed is for the church to rediscover those tools, become familiar with old practices, and apply them in iur modern context.

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  • ross boone
  • 20-12-18

Great take on how the Christian should approach the modern world

Very insightful and has tangible tips on how to live a life disrupting the system of distraction and secularism so prevalent in the first world today.

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  • Walter Mcalister
  • 12-05-19

Must read for pastors, leaders, and "influencers"

Clearly indebted to the works of James K. A. Smith and Charles Taylor, this book helps those who have not been exposed to these works and brings them to face some very difficult realities confronting the church today. Lest we be neutralised by culture, we must make some very hard choices about message, mission and method in expressing, celebrating and proclaiming the Gospel. An important read, to be sure, but not a light one. But, must be read more than once. It is too dense and technical to be truly useful after only one read.

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  • E. Hart
  • 01-04-19

Heavy!

Interesting and compelling but I would think heavy and difficult for the average reader. Have your dictionary close by. The reader had a very mechanical type voice so it often felt like listening to a college textbook.