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Summary

Of all the weird characters Detective Superintendent Peter Diamond has met in Bath, this one is the most extreme: a 21st-century private eye called Johnny Getz, whose office is over Shear Amazing, a hairdressing salon. Johnny has been hired by Ruby Hubbard, whose father, an antiques shop owner, has gone missing, and Johnny insists on involving 'Pete' in his investigation. 

When Diamond, Johnny and Ruby enter the shop, they find a body and a murder investigation is launched. Diamond is forced to house his team in the dilapidated Corn Market building across the street. His problems grow when his boss appoints Lady Bede, from the Police Ethics Committee, as an observer. Worse still, Johnny conducts his own inquiry by latching onto Ruby's stylish friend, a journalist called Olympia. 

Shootings from a drive-by gunman at key players create mayhem and the pressure is really on. Can the team stop more killings in this normally peaceful city? What happened to Ruby's father? And will Johnny crack the case before Diamond does?

©2021 Peter Lovesey (P)2021 Hachette Audio UK

What listeners say about Diamond and the Eye

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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Good as ever

Really enjoyed the book. The author manages once again to make the story quite fresh and different but because the characters and settings are familiar, it’s instantly enjoyable.

If you don’t know the series, do start at the beginning as you will enjoy following the characters’ stories. And if you you know Bath, you will also enjoy them even more.

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Disappointed

too much bad language - giving up. Loved most of the other Diamond books.

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Poor Narration

I have read all of Peter Lovesey’s books but found this one disappointing.

It wasn’t helped by the poor narration.

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  • J
  • 17-07-21

Sub standard Diamond

Come on Peter Lovesey this is the most disappointing Diamond book you have written.
Pre ordered it as delighted there was a new Diamond to add to my library.
What a let down. Thin plot, none of the irascible old Diamond to enjoy.
Swapping between Getz and Diamond is confusing and the Getz character is not at all believable.
Have listened to my old ‘Diamonds’ many times, struggling to finish this one sadly.

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Is Peter Lovesey bored with Peter Diamond?

If I’d wanted to hear a book in the style of Raymond Chandler I would not have gone for a book about a crusty British Bath police inspector. The story’s occasional brush with accuracy and realism was so brief at times I thought we had crossed over to a US tv cop drama! The main character wasn’t Peter Diamond. He felt like nothing but supporting cast in this book in the series. It was competent, hung together, but so tongue in cheek it feels like he is taking the mickey out of the reader. Even at the end when the main characters, bar one, are grouped together Poirot style Peter simply gives out figurative slaps on the wrist for serious infractions of the law, and a murder no less! I know it’s supposed to be fiction, but it helps for the characters and plot to be believable to give depth to the book and sustain interest.