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Darkest Hour

How Churchill Brought Us Back from the Brink
Narrated by: Sean Barrett
Length: 6 hrs and 40 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (99 ratings)
Regular price: £19.99
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Summary

Penguin presents the audiobook edition of The Darkest Hour by Anthony McCarten, read by Sean Barrett.

From the prize-winning screenwriter of The Theory of Everything, this is a cinematic, behind-the-scenes account of a crucial moment which takes us inside the mind of one of the world's greatest leaders - and provides a revisionist, more rounded portrait of his leadership.

May 1940. Britain is at war, European democracies are falling rapidly and the public are unaware of this dangerous new world. Just days after his unlikely succession to Prime Minister, Winston Churchill faces this horror - and a sceptical King and a party plotting against him. He wonders how he can capture the public mood and does so magnificently before leading the country to victory.

It is this fascinating period that Anthony McCarten captures in this deeply researched, gripping day-by-day (and often hour-by-hour) narrative. In doing so he revises the familiar view of Churchill - he made himself into the iconic figure we remember and changed the course of history, but through those turbulent and dangerous weeks he was plagued by doubt and even explored a peace treaty with Nazi Germany. It's a scarier and more human story than has ever been told.

©2017 Anthony McCarten (P)2017 Penguin AudioBooks

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    5 out of 5 stars

Awesome insight into

Churchill’s humanity

If the film is as half as good as this book it’s going to be a corker!!

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Penny
  • United Kingdom
  • 16-01-18

Superb

I loved The Darkest Hour by Anthony McCarten, the background to Churchill's beginnings as the new Prime Minister in May 1940 when Hitler was advancing through Europe and decisions he had to make as troops were being evacuated from Dunkirk. It is how he overcame the pressures from Halifax and Chamberlain to attempt to negotiate with the Italians, and how Churchill became the Churchill that took us through the war.
Brilliantly read by Sean Barrett, hope you enjoy it.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Captivating

A book that truly defines "success as the result of many failures" Simply a great book.

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Excellent read. Seems well researched

It says on this input screen "optional" but then won't let me submit without minimum 15 words. Book was excellent feedback system needs work and gets 1 star

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amazing book!! true leadership

I thought this book us an amazing example of a leader that through unbelievable pressure put himself 2nd and the great good of the nation first!! amazing

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Insight into such a hard time

A look into a time when Britain was on the brink of disaster. A book that helps to show Churchill’s and Britain’s fight against unbelievable odds at beginning of WW2 . Helps to show Churchill’s strength, weaknesses , doughts, bloody mindedness and turmoils . Enjoyed the film and book.

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Darkest Hour

After seeing the film, the book lived up to my expectations, Brilliant!
In Churchills own words; "So much is owed by so many by so few", he being one of the few!

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Astounding book. Listened to it three times...

This is a really good read/listen. Factual and exciting. Beautifully narrated, bringing this incredible true tale alive. Will read a fourth time, no doubt....

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A different account of a well known story

Well researched and written, fine narration, Churchill made some very difficult choices. The author gives good analysis of the three monumental speeches that Churchill made in the first three months of his premiership and the sources of his oratory. He also gives some detail of Churchill's eccentricities which brought a smile to my face. The author draws some interesting conclusions, was Churchill prepared to negotiate a peace treaty with Hitler or was he simply trying to keep Halifax and Chamberlain on side? Highly enjoyable listen

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a truly inspiring and believable interpretation

This version of the early part of the Second World War is entirely convincing and shows what an amazing and inspiring a leader Churchill was. it clearly shows the incredible pressures he was under in May 1940 and paints a totally believable picture of a real man and all the contradictory forces being applied to him.

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  • Jo
  • 27-01-18

Educational and Inspirational

Enjoyed the insights into his formative years and their repercussions for his behavior pattern. Particularly like how the author delved into these events and how they affected his speech writing abilities. Churchill is humanized, yet his impact on history isn't diminished.