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Dark Emu

Black Seeds: Agriculture or Accident?
Narrated by: Bruce Pascoe
Length: 5 hrs and 36 mins
4.7 out of 5 stars (39 ratings)

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Summary

A completely accessible, compelling and riveting account of pre-invasion Aboriginal agricultural systems.

Dark Emu argues for a reconsideration of the 'hunter-gatherer' tag for pre-colonial Aboriginal Australians and attempts to rebut the colonial myths that have worked to justify dispossession. Accomplished author Bruce Pascoe provides compelling evidence from the diaries of early explorers that suggests that systems of food production and land management have been blatantly understated in modern retellings of early Aboriginal history, and that a new look at Australia's past is required.

©2014 Bruce Pascoe (P)2017 Bolinda audio

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life changing

I wept with this book. what we are doing to Mumma Earth is unforgivable. who the hell do we think we are. I've been reading this beautiful book whilst working in Australia and it's completely changed how I see this beautiful land and what's been done to it. the little people the world over need to rise again and save us before it's too late. the brutes have screwed it all up.

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Eye opening and a must have

Paints an amazing picture, and all based on factual historical accounts. I will now view the landscape through another lens.

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A must read listen and know

Wow! Thank you for looking, finding out and sharing all this information. I’m learning the truth about the world and this has to be up there on info to share in schools.

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informative but a struggle

Contains a lot of info about aboriginals, that rectifies general misconceptions. But most of it is scattered and that makes it hard to follow. The Australian accent didn't help for me either.

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Moving away from ingnorance

It was very refreshing hearing the accounts and modern science behind the way the aborigines farmed and cared for their land in ingenious and natural ways. Having travelled Australia and driving through the centre which looked very desolate this book offers a different perspective. Perhaps the most shocking take away from this book is that Australia, before cattle, sheep and western agricultural practices became the norm, Australia was a lush country with some areas being compared to some of the UK's finest estates with lush vegetation and forest. Let's hope modern scientific trials can continue and unlock the secrets the indigenous population already knew through their shared knowledge of how to look after and work with the land, to make it productive and healthy once more.

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  • Matt Powers
  • 07-05-18

One of the best books ever!!!!

Worth every penny and more!!! Thank you so much for this amazing and precious work - I wish I had all your resources to read now!!

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Profile Image for Colin Priest
  • Colin Priest
  • 21-01-19

Propaganda posing as scholarship

Let me save you time reading this book. It can be summarised as Australian Aboriginals good, Europeans evil. With sloppy research, cherry picking of facts, and mere wishful thinking, the author presents a politically correct fantasy. Note that whenever facts are not available that supports his argument, the author assumes that's because evil Europeans destroyed the evidence. Whenever a settler’s journal notes something positive about the natives, it is accepted without question. Yet whenever a settler’s journal remains silent or says something negative, its because evil Europeans are biased. This isn't scholarship - it’s mere propaganda.

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