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Chronic Pain, Anxiety, Food Intolerance and More: Sufferers of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder

Transcend Mediocrity, Book 108
By: J.B. Snow
Narrated by: Carl Moore
Length: 37 mins
2.5 out of 5 stars (2 ratings)

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Summary

I am a writer, but, most importantly, I am a mother of children affected by high-functioning autism. As far back as I can remember, many of my family members have also been stricken with symptoms that are consistent with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

Like many of my listeners, I remember constantly being ill as a child. I couldn't do many of the activities that my peers could do. Sometimes I was sent to the doctor, and other times I was sent home from school. Since my mother was a nurse, I thought that maybe my symptoms were normal. After all, why wouldn't she take me to the doctor to have these symptoms treated?

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a genetic disorder that is frightening and elusive to the medical community. It is one of many inherited disorders that affect the connective tissues in the body, including collagen. Many physicians will tell their patients that their symptoms are all in their heads. They might classify the patient as mentally ill, a hypochondriac, or a drug seeker. Sufferers of chronic pain might eventually give up seeking help from the medical community altogether when they are faced with these labels and skeptical physicians.

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is known to be a condition in which people usually have hypermobile joints and stretchy skin. This is what physicians generally look for when they are considering EDS diagnoses. The truth is that EDS can present in many different ways. There are many different types and forms of EDS, and they affect very different parts of a person's body. A physician who looks for only two signs is missing the big picture of the family history and the patient's symptoms in relation to an EDS diagnosis.

©2016 J.B. Snow (P)2016 J.B. Snow

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interesting and informative.

knowledge is wisdom, prevention may become cure especially for our siblings who inherit these genes.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Profile Image for Shae Cozzens
  • Shae Cozzens
  • 14-10-18

Aweful.

I am dating someone with EDS. I bought this in Hope of learning more about the condition. I didn't this book isn't worth the $2.00. Its obvious all the research the person did was on google and this is their first book. Its 80% of lists.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Profile Image for J. Ortman
  • J. Ortman
  • 19-07-18

just a list of symptoms

This is just an all encompassing symptom list. Readers are referred to the Internet for more information.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Profile Image for Alana
  • Alana
  • 22-10-19

🤦🏾‍♀️🤦🏾‍♀️

When the author started trying to make a link between Autism, and Ehlers-Danlos that's when they lost me. Mostly because of the crazy chicken, or egg question posed of whether the physical problem is caused by a psychological condition... Even if there's a possibility of a link between the two, it would be intelligent for anyone with any type of medical knowledge, or indeed information to posit that the genetic mutation may have lead to the neurological, and psychological issues; not vice versa. Also, to make it an evolution issue is also quite ludicrously ignorant. With possibly some type of bigotry bias built-in whether the person knows it or not. The narrator was so dry, and wooden that you could use his voice for kindling!