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Changeable

How Collaborative Problem Solving Changes Lives at Home, at School, and at Work
Narrated by: J. Stuart Ablon
Length: 7 hrs and 16 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (2 ratings)

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Summary

A bold new way to help anyone change

Why is it so hard to change problem behavior - in our kids, our colleagues, and even ourselves? Conventional methods often backfire, creating a downward spiral of resentment and frustration, and a missed opportunity for growth. What if the thinking behind these old methods is wrong? What if people don’t misbehave because they want to, but because they lack the skills to do better? Or as renowned psychologist J. Stuart Ablon asks, what if changing problem behavior is a matter of skill, not will

Based on more than 25 years of clinical work with juvenile offenders as well training parents, teachers, counselors, and law enforcement, and supported by research in neuroscience, Changeable presents a radical new way of thinking about challenging and unwanted behavior - Collaborative Problem Solving - that builds empathy, helps others reach their full potential, and most of all really works. 

With illuminating scientific evidence, remarkable success stories, and actionable insights, Changeable gives parents, teachers, CEOs, and anyone interested in learning about why we behave the way we do a roadmap for helping people grow.

*Includes a bonus PDF with charts and graphs. 

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.  

©2018 J. Stuart Ablon (P)2018 Penguin Audio

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  • Anonymous User
  • 09-02-19

Must read!

A fantastic book, that I recommend EVERYONE to read! I'm going to actively spread the word to everyone I know!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Michelle Shafer
  • 02-11-18

Perfect for parents, bosses and humans who have to interact with other humans!

I’ve worked at one of the institutions Dr. Ablon mentions, and I’ve been trained in CPS multiple times. This. Stuff. Really. Works. I use it with my roommates, my colleagues and even my supervisor. It’s not a “soft method” but instead just a way of thinking about, and speaking to other people that considers their perspectives and concerns instead of just your own. This book sums it up with great clarity, and I found it so interesting. Definitely take the time to give it a read/listen!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Stubbegubbe
  • 02-11-19

Enlightening, revolutionary thinking

another title could be
"How to best relate to any human being"
Awesome. loved it

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  • Jay
  • 10-10-19

Great!

I think it is a great book. Like another comment said, there is a political section at the end but I don't think he was taking a political side but rather expressing a lack of leadership in this particular area.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 10-08-19

Why bring your politics in?

Why bring your politics in? The last chapter was solely about the author’s politics. I do not think that was necessary and seemed to detract from the collaborative problem solving model which was the whole point of the book.

The author needs to research religious terrorism of the Middle East. He seemed to not know anything about it to be making such broad, sweeping statements about using collaborative problem solving with them.

Again, the author needs to leave politics out of the book. It’s not a book about politics and will offend some readers. They might think, “If he’s so wrong in the last chapter, maybe he’s wrong in the rest of the book too.”