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Summary

The real story of one of the greatest explorers who ever lived by the man described by the Guinness Book of Records as ‘the world's greatest living explorer’.

Sir Ranulph Fiennes is uniquely qualified to write a new biography of Captain Scott. This is the first biography of Scott by someone who has experienced the deprivations, the stress and the sheer physical pain that Scott lived through. Ranulph Fiennes tells the story of Scott’s life – and discusses how his achievements have been viewed after his death – with empathy and great skill.

©2003 Ranulph Fiennes (P)2003 Hodder & Stoughton

What listeners say about Captain Scott

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lifeless delivery

This may have been a great book - respect to Ranulph Fiennes for his bold exploring - but the bloodless delivery made it, for me, unlistenable. Audible should exercise more quality control on narration - I've had to exchange more audiobooks for what I took to be inadequate reading skills, than poor writing skills - shame to spoil a good piece of work that way. When print goes to audio it's a different medium and needs to be presented in a professional, skillfull way.

2 people found this helpful

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Setting The Record Straight

Absolutely brilliant book and although Ranulph Fiennes is careful to present the facts, it is clear that Scott has indeed been misjudged and poorly treated in some quarters. This book is a masterpiece in unpicking the truth in "righting some wrongs" and not only is this a very moving story but beautifully read by the author. I would strongly recommend this book to anyone who is interested in true polar history. One of the best polar books I have had the pleasure in reading.

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very informative and detailed.

A realistic unbiased book , at last giving a true hero some of the credit he and his intrepid companions deserve. Debunking the debunkers !

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very enjoyable book

A very interesting story although sometimes Fines is a bit monotoned. Still a very good listen and i learned a lot

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Terrible Delivery

Ranulph Fiennes is obviously a well respected explorer in his own right and no doubt that's why he was chosen to read this account, however he is not a voiceover artist. Not only is the quality of the audio pretty poor but Fiennes delivery is f*king abysmal. He must have recorded it himself and then emailed it to the publishing company. I bet they just cast him without doing a test record and when the first audio files came through from Ranulph they realised what a massive mistake they made. He has the most monotone emotionless delivery imaginable. It's the perfect case for increasing funding in AI.

7 people found this helpful

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Excellent, unbiased review of Scott's expedition

I am an avid reader of polar expeditions, and seen most documentaries out there. It has bothered me for some time the negative image I was presented of Captain Scott, and then I listened to this book. Very good, excellent portrayal of Scott without melodrama or exaggeration. It is much helpful when Fiennes compares Scott's odyssey to his own, givind details of what he went through.
Updated with the latest scientific data as to weather and conditions under Scott's travel, gives a better understanding of what these men had to go through.
I like the fact that he seems very partial to my favorite, Schackleton, and even to Amundsen (whom I also love and loath).
I was a little bit bummed by the author's voice at the beginning but it went over quite quickly.
I seriously recommend this book!

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factual, enchanting and captivating

thank you once again for writing such captivating material for this armchair adventurer! greatly enjoyed.

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Review of captain scott

I could not fault this version of captain Scott's journey to the South Pole by Sir Ranulph Fiennes this was a truly fantastic story of human endeavour

A must read

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Excellent

For those with an interest in such things, this factual account outshines many others.
For those without an interest in such things, this is a gripping yarn!
My admiration for the author, whose matter of fact, understatement is perfect, yet also clearly endured, and the subjects whose gallantry and pluck belong to another long forgotten time is immense.
Thank you for this piece of work.

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The End of the Lies

I can only congratulate Sir Ran Fiennes for seeking so earnestly and conscientiously to examine fully the events around the fateful Scott expedition to Antarctica. It is a fascinating, measured and thoughtfully rendered account. For me it rings a faint bell of hope that the days of ignorant detraction for the sake of it, based on the detractors’ own lack of self worth and hang ups may be one day be numbered. We live in an era of detraction and gratuitous vitriol and with great tact and delicacy Fiennes decries the perpetrators with no thought of advancing himself. Balance can and must be restored. This book takes a big first step towards it.

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  • Derek
  • 08-02-12

Humanity's last great earthly challenge

If you could sum up Captain Scott in three words, what would they be?

Agonizing Frostbitten Defeat

What was one of the most memorable moments of Captain Scott?

One of the most graphic and intense images I've experienced in a novel was the discovery of Oates' collapsed body. I could feel the non-fiction frostbite burning his non-fiction flesh. Intense.

Which character – as performed by Ranulph Fiennes – was your favorite?

Narrator

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

There were a couple of moments in the book that moved me - one was when the team had finally reached the pole, only to discover that Amundson had already been there. The other moment was when the team reached their depot only to find it was not well supplied (fuel had leaked).

Any additional comments?

The story was great - a non fictionalized account of the last great earthly expedition. It was well narrated, with the annunciation and precision that only the English could offer, but it did get a bit distracted at the end I felt as though throughout most of the novel that Sir Fiennes was acting in defense of Scott, even though Sir Fiennes declared that this would be a transparent view of the events that had transpired. The mask really came off during his 20 'or so' minute rant at the end of the novel. I felt that was unnecessary. Other than that, I can't imagine a better person to provide insight into a journey of this magnitude. Sir Ranulph Fiennes was very appreciative of the efforts that this journey would have taken. Details of equipment (tents, boots, et al.) were welcomed. The author provided a credible level detail and insight that could be matched by few (if any) others on the planet. Aside, observing Sir Fiennes body of work, I believe him to be the inspiration for the fictional Dos Eqies spokesperson - The World's Most Interesting Man.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Jonathan
  • 18-11-18

Surprisingly dull narration

The story of Captain Scott is both amazing and inspiring although I was disappointed with how boring Ranulph was able to make the epic tale sound.

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  • happygilmore
  • 01-04-18

Riveting tale, beautifully narrated by the author!

Would you consider the audio edition of Captain Scott to be better than the print version?

This audio edition is better for a simple reason: Ranulph Fiennes' narration. Definitely a good storyteller.

What other book might you compare Captain Scott to and why?

If you are looking for historical detail, Fiennes' own "Race to the Pole" is better source; but it's 3 times as long. If you're looking for the same high-level details but with a tighter storyline, go with this one.

Which scene was your favorite?

The slow trudge back from the Pole, defeated and starving, is incredibly moving.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

Definitely made me sad.