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Black Dogs

Narrated by: Philip Franks
Length: 4 hrs and 59 mins
3.5 out of 5 stars (13 ratings)
Regular price: £14.99
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Summary

In 1946, June and Bernard set off on their honeymoon. Fired by their ideals and passion for one another, they had planned an idyllic holiday, but in France they witness an event that alters the course of their lives entirely.

Forty years on, their son-in-law is trying to uncover the cause of their estrangement and is led back to this moment on honeymoon and an experience of such darkness it was to wrench the couple apart.

©2018 Ian McEwan (P)2018 Audible, Ltd

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Menace within Europe

Through the narrative framework of Jeremy researching for a memoir of his estranged parents in law, Bernard and June Tremaine, McEwan's 1992 novel explores the dire situation in Europe, which is remarkably appropriate to now.

Bernard and June were committed communists but their separate intellectual development separated them. Through the disjointed account of the relationship between these two and of key events such as the fall of the Berlin Wall, and of the June's terrifying encounter with wild dogs on her honeymoon, McEwan presents an intellectual analysis of the rupture of Europe.

Although the characters are clearly explored through the decades, the most important element of the novel is intellectual and metaphorical, the current situation giving it extra bite.

Extremely well read.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Metaphors that don't bark but rip your soul apart


Again Ian McEwan brings to life characters and events while placing questions and conundrums that are devastating for the protagonists and the reader, like how can we pretend we know how to change the world when we can not fix the most familial of problems, do we recognize evil when we see it or do we pretend it is just history or a story.

The story of two lovers viewed from an angle that is unromantic at first glance but hides true love and the desperation of not having salvation. Two historical events that change Europe, two beliefs and two metaphors that grow out of this histories and out of the primordial evil of war and creed.

This book is literature that reverberates in the reader.

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Among his best books

Deep, disturbing book playing upon quite a few personal strings. Oscillating between giggles and shivers all the way. Echoes of his later books. Trademark crispy turn of phrase and "bomb drop" moment. Deserves listening-to twice over, to which I am proceeding. P.S. Brilliant narrator!