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  • Behind the Enigma

  • The Authorised History of GCHQ, Britain’s Secret Cyber-Intelligence Agency
  • By: John Ferris
  • Narrated by: Charles Armstrong
  • Length: 30 hrs and 32 mins
  • Categories: History, Europe
  • 4.0 out of 5 stars (3 ratings)

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Summary

Bloomsbury presents Behind the Enigma by John Ferris, read by Charles Armstrong.

You know about MI5. 

You know about MI6. 

Now uncover the story behind Britain’s most secretive intelligence agency in the first-ever authorised history of GCHQ.

©2020 John Ferris (P)2020 Bloomsbury Publishing Plc

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All cloak, no dagger

Since WW2, the United Kingdom has maintained its global influence not through its dwindling military power but its skill in hacking everyone else's calls and messages and then giving them to the United States. As this book makes clear, the so-called 'special relationship' hinges predominantly, and precariously, on the ability of Britain's 'signals' intelligence agency GCHQ to keep one step ahead in the bugging game. Given the sensitivity and importance of its work it's hardly surprising that its secrets are among the UK's most closely guarded, and that any 'authorised' history is unlikely to contain any new or startling revelations. Anyone interested in civil service internal politics may find this work fascinating but you will need expertise in cryptography to decipher the endless stream of acronyms. Those expecting tales of James Bond style derring-do and Dan Brown style conspiracies will be disappointed, as will anyone hoping for a reasoned discussion, or indeed any discussion, on the wrongs and rights of "bulk interception" of everyone's internet activity.