Regular price: £32.09

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – choose any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • Free, unlimited access to Audio Shows
  • After your trial, Audible is just £7.99/month
OR
In Basket

Summary

Roughly 2,500 years ago, the Athenian people established a radical democracy in which power derived from the votes of everyday citizens. At a time when local governments ranged from oligarchy to tyranny, the elite classes of Athens gradually ceded power to the inexperienced masses, whose votes served as referendums for everything from taxation to war to welfare. The sequence of events that led to this development is astonishing, and the society that flourished under Athenian democracy is one of the greatest - even if greatly flawed - achievements in world history.

Today, when the foundations of our own democracy are under greater and greater scrutiny, the Athenian experiment in citizen rule offers a powerful object lesson in national politics. How did the Athenian system of democracy work? What were its strengths and weaknesses? And how does it compare to democracy in our world today? Athenian Democracy: An Experiment for the Ages answers these questions and more with 24 captivating lectures. Professor Robert Garland of Colgate University takes us back to ancient Greece and unpacks the development and workings of Athenian democracy. You'll witness the story of history through the lens of Athenian government, going inside the assemblies and courts to find out how democracy worked - and where it came up short.

You may be familiar with the broad strokes of Athenian history, but Professor Garland's unique lens offers a wealth of insights into everything from taxation and welfare to military structure and strategy. Go beyond the traditional "kings and battles" history to gain a sense of what life was like for the people living in the democracy. The heart of Athenian democracy is the "demos", the body of citizens who participated in public assemblies, made speeches, and voted on matters of law. But because only citizens were allowed to vote, Professor Garland also explores Athens through the eyes of women, immigrants, and slaves who could not participate. 

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.  

©2018 The Great Courses (P)2018 The Teaching Company, LLC

What members say

Average customer ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
No Reviews are Available
Sort by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Mark
  • 26-05-18

A vote for Prof. Garland

Professor Garland is a dedicated classicist and will not entertain any challenge to Athens’ pre-eminence as the birthplace of democracy. Drawing upon a variety of ancient sources, he offers a detailed, sometimes lyrical analysis of the world’s first experiment in government by the people. What I enjoyed most were his frequent comparisons between classical democracy and the modern variety practiced in the United States. Professor Garland is not shy about sharing his opinions, and he is often wryly contemptuous of America’s 45th president. According to Professor Garland, the peril which democracy now faces makes this lecture series especially urgent and necessary.

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Paul M. Floyd
  • 24-07-18

Second course from this excellent professor

I listened to the Audible audio version of this course and it was very good – – but I’m sure the streaming video version would’ve been better with pictures and charts maps etc. I’ve listened to two other courses on similar subjects at the great teaching course opus and this is a very good course. professor Garland is excellent teacher with good content and enthusiasm. I thought much of the course was exceptional and I especially liked the current application. I don’t think it was over the top or too much— in fact I think as the world moves forward— by understanding democracy as it was utilized in Athens as well as since then is very helpful in giving some context to the current political and social world we live in. I found the topics very practical and also informative. I would strongly recommend this course.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Jordan Miles Robles
  • 10-06-18

For anyone who loves Greek history

Loved this course and like how Robert gives examples to dumb it down for us to really understand what it was like and how similar we are to the Athenians. Also really like the dramatic music in the beginning of each lecture.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful