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Summary

Why are measures of stress and anxiety on the rise when economists and politicians tell us we have never had it so good? While statistics tell us that the vast majority of people are getting steadily richer, the world most of us experience day in and day out feels increasingly uncertain, unfair, and ever more expensive. In Angrynomics, Eric Lonergan and Mark Blyth explore the rising tide of anger, sometimes righteous and useful, sometimes destructive and ill-targeted, and propose radical new solutions for an increasingly polarized and confusing world. Angrynomics is for anyone wondering, where the hell do we go from here?

©2020 Eric Lonergan and Mark Blyth (P)2020 Blackstone Publishing

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Welcome new ideas for a time that badly needs them

An accessible, logical and inspiring perspective on where we are at as a civilisation, and where we might go next which is uplifting and compatible with optimism!

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Stop everything and read this short book

The two authors get to the heart of what has been going wrong with capitalism in its various guises. The book is written as a conversation between the two leading to what a new form of capitalism should look like. There solitons have merit and have actually started to be used in the pandemic.

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great listen. really enjoyed some of the concepts

the guys really get you thinking about the flow of money and How thinking differently about money is a good thing tk do

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Very informative book

This is a brilliant book for those who want to know more about how the financial crisis affected us all and what the best ways out of it would’ve been. Some very interesting theories on how governments can generate wealth for all of its citizens not just the 1%.

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Fantastic - congratulations to the authors

A brilliantly argued & presented book. Required reading for all politicians & policy makers if we want a more stable and equitable society.

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  • Nessan Harpur
  • 08-02-21

Better read than listen

I have this book in paperback and in audible. I’ve heard these authors speak on podcasts and they’re excellent, engaging. I actually heard them talk up this book and was really looking forward to it in audible.

The story is great but the delivery is very irritating. The transitions from Lonergan to Blyth are very distracting, it’s hard to follow the content. Then whenever Blyth ‘asks a genuine question’, I found it interrupts your listening and you end up losing track of the discussion.

Lonergan will be finishing a well articulated and engaging point on tribalism or inequality, when abruptly it feels, he is interrupted by Blyth who proceeds to ask an emotionless and canned question which removes any feeling whatsoever that this is a genuine dialogue. Instead it’s irritating and then you miss part of the others argument or continued point.

Having seen the printed copy, I would recommend that above this. It could be excellent as a dialogue but the performance is just too poor.

It would’ve been better if just Lonergan or just Blyth had of narrated, I’ve seen multiple narrators work elsewhere but not here.