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Summary

Bloomsbury presents Ageless by Andrew Steele, read by Andrew Steele.

Ageless is a guide to the science driving biology’s biggest story: why we get old and how we can stop it.

Ageing - not cancer, not heart disease - is the world’s leading cause of death and suffering. We accept as inevitable that as we get older our bodies and minds begin to deteriorate, and we are increasingly likely to be struck by dementia or disease. Ageing is so deeply ingrained in human experience that we never think to ask: is it necessary?

Biologists, on the other hand, have been investigating that question for years.

Ageless introduces us to the cutting-edge research that is paving the way for a revolution in medicine. It takes us inside the laboratories where scientists are studying every aspect of the body - DNA, mitochondria, stem cells, our immune systems, even longevity genes that have helped animals to a tenfold increase in lifespan - all in an effort to forestall or reverse our decline.

Computational biologist Andrew Steele explains what is happening as we age and practical ways we can help slow down the process. He reveals how understanding the scientific implications of ageing could lead to the greatest discovery in the history of medicine - one that has the potential to improve billions of lives, save trillions of dollars and transform the human condition.

©2020 Andrew Steele (P)2020 Bloomsbury Publishing Plc

Critic reviews

"An absolute tour de force." (Aubrey de Grey, chief science officer, SENS Research Foundation)

"An immensely important book." (Professor Lewis Dartnell, author of Origins)

"This is an essential book for anyone interested in the fast-developing science of longevity." (Jim Mellon, chairman of Juvenescence)

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Brilliant book

With 2020 behind us this book is ideal reading on the new frontier in genetics and medicine: Aging Steele addresses an array of topics in a readable narrative with a Brysonesque style.

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A great overview into the main experiments in aging research

I really liked this book. It gave me a good insight into the different aspects that are being tackled in current research to mitigate or even eliminate the effects of aging. The book is very well narrated and does not overpromise the results of the different techniques being trialed. I recommend it thoroughly!

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Eye Opening and Inspiring

No one wants to get old. This rigorously researched book provides an optimistic insight into ultimately engineering out our natural flaws. Good Stuff!!!

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Surprisingly good!

I honestly thought I wouldn't find much new information in this book but to my surprise it was really informative and very well explained.

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allot of waffle,but good introduction to the naive

if you have never thought about longevity or done any Google searches or research into the field of longevity medicine or gerontology, I would highly recommend this book. the author introduces the basic concepts in an accessible manner. if on the other hand you are not totally naive to these things, you might find this book a bit underwhelming. I have gone as far as chapter 5 but there seems to be a lot of waffle, not as much substance as I would like. It's like the author doesn't really get to the meat of the argument for ages, for the sake of building the context for it. Then when he does get to it, he briefly mentions something from the science in a cursory manner before moving on and leaving it behind. Sweet talker... I think the target audience is for people who are generally uneducated, or aren't interested or initiated. Could be a good present.