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Summary

September, 1942. Jo Hardy, a 22-year-old ferry pilot, is delivering a Spitfire when she has the unnerving experience of someone shooting at her aircraft. A few days later, she hears that another ferry pilot has been killed when her aircraft crashed in the same area of Kent. Although the death has been attributed to ‘pilot error’, Jo is convinced there is a link between the two incidents. 

Jo takes her suspicions to Maisie Dobbs, and while Maisie wants to find out why someone appears to want to take down much needed pilots, she finds it is part of a much larger operation involving Eleanor Roosevelt, the American president’s First Lady. To protect Eleanor’s life - and possibly the safety of all of London - Maisie must quickly uncover the connection.

©2022 Jacqueline Winspear (P)2022 W F Howes

What listeners say about A Sunlit Weapon

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Excellent in every way

A wonderful character in Maise, set in England 1942. She has intelligence, deep psychological insight and a outstanding investigative mind. She sets the story in the war,, she highlights the bravery and part played by women as well as men at that time, including the role of women pilots An outstanding,.complicated exciting plot solved with, a mind set on justice for all. The performance was very good. Read this.

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Good narrator easy to listen to

loved it wish there were more to the series enjoyed all maisie dobbs books

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Good but not her best

We love this series but usually read the books. This time we thought we would try the audio book. While I enjoyed the narrator using her normal British accent, the American accents were dreadful to the point of being distracting. We are going back to reading the books!

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Like threadbare patchwork

Was initially pleased to find a new book in this series, but after not very long in, wondered if Ms Winspear had actually written it as there were odd terms ie carving the chicken and giving each a paltry (poultry) portion. This unwitting pun seems so awkward and out of place; there are other awkward word choices too. Heated radiators in bathrooms in August? We didn't have heated radiators in our bathroom until 1981 and certainly not on in August. There were also "Americanisms" not typical. I have had all the books in this series so count myself a suitable judge or her cant and lexicon, her ability to inbuild tension and drama, but found all this lacking here.

Maisie a smart, independent investigator, who has operated behind enemy lines in Gestapo Germany, suddenly is taking direction from her new husband, seemingly incapable of forming her own decisions. This story is like an old quilt: it has reflections of it's former glory, but it's now sad, threadbare and almost unrecognizable.

In 1746, improvements to the River Medway meant that barges of 40 long tons (41 t) could reach Tonbridge. It is not a narrow stream. It is fast flowing, 2nd largest river in England after the Thames; it's why Chatham Dockyard is where it is, deep enough for submarines and warships; so parts of this story make little sense.

Even the narrator sounded worn out.

Gave up at hour 5. DID NOT ENJOY